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I wonder why this query still works perfectly. I thought a WHERE clause always has to start with WHERE?

    SELECT `persons`.*
    FROM `persons`
    LEFT JOIN `team_memberships`
    ON (`team_memberships`.`participant` = `persons`.`id`)
    JOIN `teams`
    ON (`teams`.`id` = `team_memberships`.`team`)
    JOIN `departments`
    ON (`departments`.`id` = `teams`.`department`)
    JOIN `areas`
    ON (`areas`.`id` = `departments`.`area`)
    JOIN `companies`
    ON (`companies`.`id` = `areas`.`company`)

    [NO WHERE HERE]

    AND `persons`.`id` = ?
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Maybe the joins act as an implicit WHERE? In T-SQL, joins can be written with a WHERE clause, so this could be similar behavior in reverse. –  Michael Gardner Mar 20 '13 at 14:56
    
I'm not sure, but I think the AND belongs to the last JOIN keyword: JOIN companies ON (companies.id = areas.company) AND persons.id = ?. –  MC Emperor Mar 20 '13 at 14:58
    
Okay so what does it mean to join with an AND condition? Should I skip WHERE? This happened by accident by the way, it should originally been WHERE there. –  silkfire Mar 20 '13 at 14:59
    
if you need your condition to be in the where part then put it there. there are cases where you need it in your on clause. for example if you are doing a left join and want only special rows from the joined table to be selected. –  ITroubs Mar 20 '13 at 15:02
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6 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You've just added an AND to your ON clause. The ON clause just evaluates to a boolean true or false, and so AND and eg OR boolean operators are allowed, with all the usual rules about parenthesis etc applying also.

It's often advantageous to move conditions that are specific to a particular joined table, from your WHERE clause and into the appropriate ON clause - if for no other reason than to improve readability.

It can make logical* sense to limit the results of a join before going on to join on other tables, rather than returning a big result set and then filtering this at the end with a WHERE clause. I say *logical because often the DBMS will optimise your query so that this happens anyhow... but not always... sometimes poorly performing queries can be improved by filtering at the join (and sometimes the opposite is true too).

For example, if you know that you're only interested in people over the age of 25, it makes sense to JOIN persons ON persons.id = team_memberships.participant AND persons.age > 25, rather than including all the results for the subsequent tables that only pertain to young punks only to filter these results at the end again with your WHERE persons.age > 25 clause.

My understanding is that join performance is likely to degrade as a result of additional expression(s) in the ON clause, in the instance where the additional expression(s):

  • causes an evaluation to occur on each row in the join (so my age > 25 example above might be in this category), or

  • rely on non-indexed columns from one/both joined tables, when the join would otherwise have relied only on indexed columns.

So eg it might still prove worthwhile stripping the young punks from the result set at the join even if it makes that particular join slower, because the smaller result set at that point might make a big performance increase for subsequent joins. But if their inclusion at the join yields only a slight increase in the number of records, it might actually be quicker to just include them at the join and then filter them out at the WHERE clause.

But I welcome comments clarifying/correcting my understanding.


EDIT: As per @ITroubs comment below, I really should have clarified that if the join is an INNER JOIN then the end resultset will be the same regardless of if the additional filter conditions are in the ON or WHERE clause, but for eg in OP's original example the LEFT JOIN ON team_memberships would yield a completely different resultset if the filter conditions are moved from the WHERE to the LEFT JOIN ... ON ....

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If this is the case, where should I put my condition then, as it belongs to the table persons, the original table? –  silkfire Mar 20 '13 at 15:04
    
Thanks so much. Changed the query to: ON (persons.id = ? AND team_memberships.participant = persons.id). Brilliant answer. –  silkfire Mar 20 '13 at 15:06
    
@silkfire If it makes sense to you to put it in a WHERE clause, do that. But if you move it up to LEFT JOIN team_memberships ON team_memberships.participant = persons.id AND persons.id = ? you'll see that you can (I think*) normalise this to LEFT JOIN team_memberships ON team_memberships.participant = ?. I say *"I think" because I'm not very familiar with MySQL so I'm not 100% sure what the ? means... ;-) –  Sepster Mar 20 '13 at 15:07
1  
@silkfire My pleasure mate. –  Sepster Mar 20 '13 at 15:10
    
Tried your normalization query and it retrieved lots of repeated data :) So I'm sticking to the first solution. The ? is a placeholder I use in PDO with prepared statements. –  silkfire Mar 20 '13 at 15:20
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if I am not mistaken then mysql executes your query as follows:

SELECT `persons`.*
FROM `persons`
LEFT JOIN `team_memberships`
ON (`team_memberships`.`participant` = `persons`.`id`)
JOIN `teams`
ON (`teams`.`id` = `team_memberships`.`team`)
JOIN `departments`
ON (`departments`.`id` = `teams`.`department`)
JOIN `areas`
ON (`areas`.`id` = `departments`.`area`)
JOIN `companies`
ON ((`companies`.`id` = `areas`.`company`) AND `persons`.`id` = ?')
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It's valid, see http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/join.html, but note how they use brackets.

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Last AND is not a part of WHERE clause, it's part of JOIN clause

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It works because you don't actually have a WHERE clause, your condition AND persons.id = ? is part of the last JOIN

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It effectively means

join  `companies` on ON (`companies`.`id` = `areas`.`company`) AND persons.id = ?

So, since you are performing inner joins - it's *almost*equvivalent. As soon as you switch to puter joins or complex queries - something will break.

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