Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a Java equivalent of the C / C++ function called frexp? If you aren't familiar, frexp is defined by Wikipedia to "break floating-point number down into mantissa and exponent."

I am looking for an implementation with both speed and accuracy but I would rather have the accuracy if I could only choose one.

This is the code sample from the first reference. It should make the frexp contract a little more clear:

/* frexp example */
#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>

int main ()
{
  double param, result;
  int n;

  param = 8.0;
  result = frexp (param , &n);
  printf ("%lf * 2^%d = %f\n", result, n, param);
  return 0;
}

/* Will produce: 0.500000 * 2^4 = 8.000000 */
share|improve this question
    
I thought the Apache Commons Math package might be a good place to find this, but I didn't see anything in there. Perhaps you could put in a feature request for it? Or, if you decide to code it up yourself, talk to them about including it in the library - seems like a useful addition to me. –  Carl Oct 12 '09 at 16:14
    
@Carl, I agree that it would be useful. I know myself and my workload very well, though, so I'm not going to commit to trying to create it on my own. I'm certain that I could do 80% of the work 80% correctly with the time that I have to invest and that's very close to worse than useless.... –  Bob Cross Oct 12 '09 at 20:22
    
the real question is: Why does frexp doesn't break the float into two integers but wants at least a float.. For a float decomposition that does not make sense (think recursion.....) –  Nils Pipenbrinck Oct 13 '09 at 21:51
    
@Nils, actually, there isn't any recursion. The result value is defined to be between 0.5 and 1.0. In that case, the exponent will always be zero. –  Bob Cross Oct 14 '09 at 1:39
add comment

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

How's this?

public static class FRexpResult
{
   public int exponent = 0;
   public double mantissa = 0.;
}

public static FRexpResult frexp(double value)
{
   final FRexpResult result = new FRexpResult();
   long bits = Double.doubleToLongBits(value);
   double realMant = 1.;

   // Test for NaN, infinity, and zero.
   if (Double.isNaN(value) || 
       value + value == value || 
       Double.isInfinite(value))
   {
      result.exponent = 0;
      result.mantissa = value;
   }
   else
   {

      boolean neg = (bits < 0);
      int exponent = (int)((bits >> 52) & 0x7ffL);
      long mantissa = bits & 0xfffffffffffffL;

      if(exponent == 0)
      {
         exponent++;
      }
      else
      {
         mantissa = mantissa | (1L<<52);
      }

      // bias the exponent - actually biased by 1023.
      // we are treating the mantissa as m.0 instead of 0.m
      //  so subtract another 52.
      exponent -= 1075;
      realMant = mantissa;

      // normalize
      while(realMant > 1.0) 
      {
         mantissa >>= 1;
         realMant /= 2.;
         exponent++;
      }

      if(neg)
      {
         realMant = realMant * -1;
      }

      result.exponent = exponent;
      result.mantissa = realMant;
   }
   return result;
}

This is "inspired" or actually nearly copied identically from an answer to a similar C# question. It works with the bits and then makes the mantissa a number between 1.0 and 0.0.

share|improve this answer
add comment

See Float.floatToIntBits and Double.doubleToLongBits. You still need a little additional logic to decode IEEE 754 floating points.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks - I'm aware of the ability to get at the bits. What I'm concerned with is not the base case of parsing s, e, and m from the bit set. I'm more worried about having a complete implementation of frexp that maintains the contract of handling all the corner cases (different flavors of NaN, for example). –  Bob Cross Oct 12 '09 at 13:19
add comment

This does do what you want.

public class Test {
  public class FRex {

    public FRexPHolder frexp (double value) {
      FRexPHolder ret = new FRexPHolder();

      ret.exponent = 0;
      ret.mantissa = 0;

      if (value == 0.0 || value == -0.0) {
        return ret;
      }

      if (Double.isNaN(value)) {
        ret.mantissa = Double.NaN;
        ret.exponent = -1;
        return ret;
      }

      if (Double.isInfinite(value)) {
        ret.mantissa = value;
        ret.exponent = -1;
        return ret;
      }

      ret.mantissa = value;
      ret.exponent = 0;
      int sign = 1;

      if (ret.mantissa < 0f) {
        sign--;
        ret.mantissa = -(ret.mantissa);
      }
      while (ret.mantissa < 0.5f) {
        ret.mantissa *= 2.0f;
        ret.exponent -= 1;
      }
      while (ret.mantissa >= 1.0f) {
        ret.mantissa *= 0.5f;
        ret.exponent++;
      }
      ret.mantissa *= sign;
      return ret;
    }
  }

  public class FRexPHolder {
    int exponent;
    double mantissa;
  }

  public static void main(String args[]) {
    new Test();
  }

  public Test() {
    double value = 8.0;
    //double value = 0.0;
    //double value = -0.0;
    //double value = Double.NaN;
    //double value = Double.NEGATIVE_INFINITY;
    //double value = Double.POSITIVE_INFINITY;

    FRex test = new FRex();
    FRexPHolder frexp = test.frexp(value);
    System.out.println("Mantissa: " + frexp.mantissa);
    System.out.println("Exponent: " + frexp.exponent);
    System.out.println("Original value was: " + value);
    System.out.println(frexp.mantissa+" * 2^" + frexp.exponent + " = ");
    System.out.println(frexp.mantissa*(1<<frexp.exponent));
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
@jitter, thanks but frexp actually works with the bits of the IEEE floating point standard rather than trying to deduce a mathematical result. That's the goal of this question. –  Bob Cross Oct 13 '09 at 21:34
    
Umm thanks to whoever for the unjustified downvote on a working solution. –  jitter Oct 14 '09 at 18:07
    
Hmm you didn't mention that in your question. And the first google results on frepx don't mention that either. –  jitter Oct 14 '09 at 18:08
add comment

I'm not familiar with the frexp function, but I think you need to look at the BigDecimal' scaled and unscaled values. 'unscaled' is the precision mantissa, scale is the exponent. In psuedocode: value = unscaledValue 10^(-scale)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Nope there is no current implementation in core Java or in the Commons Lang(most likely other place to find it) that has the exact same functionality and ease of frexp; that I know of. If it does exist it's probably in a not widely used toolkit.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If I'm reading this right...

public class Frexp {
  public static void main (String[] args)
  {
    double param, result;
    int n;

    param = 8.0;
    n = Math.getExponent(param);
    //result = ??

    System.out.printf ("%f * 2^%d = %f\n", result, n, param);
  }
}

Unfortunately, there doesn't appear to be a built-in method to get the mantissa without converting it to a BigDecimal first (or just doing the division: result = param / Math.pow(2,n).

Strangely enough, scalb does the exact opposite: take a mantissa and exponent and generate a new float from it.

share|improve this answer
    
@R. Bemrose, the whole point of the exercise is not to convert. Instead, the function takes the IEEE standard floating point representation and decodes that. The goal isn't to come up with a mathematical expression that seems to give the same answer. –  Bob Cross Oct 14 '09 at 1:37
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.