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I have found myself using the following practice, but something inside me kind of cringes every time i use it. Basically, it's a precondition test on the parameters to determine if the actual work should be done.

public static void doSomething(List<String> things)
{
    if(things == null || things.size() <= 0)
        return;

    //...snip... do actual work
}
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1  
Use a tool like PMD, Checkstyle or FindBugs to have a third opinion, then search about it. IMHO, it's not a bad practice as long as is considered under your coding standards. –  Luiggi Mendoza Mar 20 '13 at 15:16
5  
You can read a long thread here: programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/18454/… –  PeterMmm Mar 20 '13 at 15:16
    
This has got to be a duplicate. Try searching for the answer. –  Ash Burlaczenko Mar 20 '13 at 15:16
    
If it makes you cringe, it might not be the right method for you. –  akaIDIOT Mar 20 '13 at 15:17
2  
The "return only once" argument over again. Not really relevant with Java as it's common practice to return multiple times. –  Steve Kuo Mar 20 '13 at 16:27
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11 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It is good practice to return at the earliest opportunity.
That way the least amount of code gets executed and evaluated.

Code that does not run cannot be in error.

Furthermore it makes the function easier to read, because you do not have to deal with all the cases that do not apply anymore.

Compare the following code

private Date someMethod(Boolean test) {
  Date result;
  if (null == test) {
    result = null
  } else {
    result = test ? something : other;
  }
  return result;
} 

vs

private Date someMethod(Boolean test) {

  if (null == test) { 
    return null 
  }
  return test ? something : other;
} 

The second one is shorter, does not need an else and does not need the temp variable.

Note that in Java the return statement exits the function right away; in other languages (e.g. Pascal) the almost equivalent code result:= something; does not return.
Because of this fact it is customary to return at many points in Java methods.
Calling this bad practice is ignoring the fact that that particular train has long since left the station in Java.

If you are going to exit a function at many points in a function anyway, it's best to exit at the earliest opportunity

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This makes sense. I wasn't aware that some languages may not exit the function upon return. This sheds a new light on why it may be considered a 'bad practice' by some developers, and not by others. –  aglassman Mar 21 '13 at 14:26
    
The first example is actually smelly but because of the way you write it, if you code it right, it is equally readble and easier to follow the flow than your second one: private Date someMethod(Boolean test) { Date result = null; if (test != null) { result = test ? something : other; } return result; } –  Pau May 13 '13 at 14:08
    
-1. Code that does not run can certainly be in error. If code to add my deposit to a bank does not run that is an error. As for the actual question, I agree with the early return, just not for your reasons. –  user949300 Jul 6 '13 at 22:05
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It's a matter of style and personal preference. There's nothing wrong with it.

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PMD seems to think so, and that you should always let your methods run to the end, however, for certain quick sanity checks, I still use premature return statements.

It does impair the readability of the method a little, but in some cases that can be better than adding yet another if statement or other means by which to run the method to the end for all cases.

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There is no correct answer to this question, it is a matter of taste.

In the specific example above there may be better ways of enforcing a pre-condition, but I view the general pattern of multiple early returns as akin to guards in functional programming.

I personally have no issue with this style - I think it can result in cleaner code. Trying contort everything to have a single exit point can increase verbosity and reduce readability.

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It's good practice. So continue with your good work.

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Where have you read it's good practice? –  Ash Burlaczenko Mar 20 '13 at 15:18
2  
@AshBurlaczenko, does one have to have read something to consider it good practice? –  Lucas Mar 20 '13 at 15:19
3  
It's good to exit from method if there is nothing to do next.. –  VishalD Mar 20 '13 at 15:20
3  
@VishaID that's a lie/mistake. Think in code maintainance, dude. –  Jorge Antonio Díaz-Benito Mar 20 '13 at 15:22
2  
@Lucas, read/hear/learn anything. My point was if you're agreeing with one side of a debate you should back your fact up with evidence. –  Ash Burlaczenko Mar 20 '13 at 15:24
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There's nothing inherently wrong with it, but if it makes you cringe, you could throw an IllegalArgumentException instead. In some cases, that's more accurate. It could, however, result in a bunch of code that look this whenever you call doSomething:

try {
    doSomething(myList);
} catch (IllegalArgumentException e) {}
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Why would you throw exceptions all over the place? –  Johan Mar 20 '13 at 20:19
    
@Johan I wouldn't in most cases, but in situations where an early return doesn't make sense, an exception might make more sense. –  raptortech97 Mar 21 '13 at 13:40
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To the best of my understanding - no.

For the sake of easier debugging there should be only one return/exit point in a subroutine, method or function.

With such approach your program may become longer and less readable, but while debugging you can put a break point at the exit and always see the state of what you return. For example you can log the state of all local variables - it may be really helpful for troubleshooting.

It looks like there a two "schools" - one says "return as early as possible", whereas another one says "there should be only one return/exit point in a program".

I am a proponent of the first one, though in practice sometimes follow the second one, just to save time.

Also, do not forget about exceptions. Very often the fact that you have to return from a method early means that you are in an exceptional situation. In your example I think throwing an exception is more appropriate.

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So you want to sacrifice readability for debugability? Also if your throw an exception that will messup your single debug breakpoint theory, because an exception is just another return path. –  Steve Kuo Mar 20 '13 at 22:54
    
@SteveKuo As I already said there is no way to select one universal approach here, it's a trade off whatever you select. Return - for normal execution flow, exceptions for exceptional situations. With exceptions you can always see the stack trace. Single return point let you find logical bugs, rather than technical. –  Alex Kreutznaer Mar 21 '13 at 2:29
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There is nothing wrong with it. Personally, I would use else statement to execute the rest of the function, and let it return naturally.

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1  
There is no natural return. You have to explicitly have a return statement. –  Steve Kuo Mar 20 '13 at 16:59
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If you want to avoid the "return" in your method : maybe you could use a subClass of Exception of your own and handle it in your method's call ?

For example :

public static void doSomething(List<String> things) throws MyExceptionIfThingsIsEmpty {
    if(things == null || things.size() <= 0)
        throw new MyExceptionIfThingsIsEmpty(1, "Error, the list is empty !");    

    //...snip... do actual work
}

Edit : If you don't want to use the "return" statement, you could do the opposite in the if() :

if(things != null && things.size() > 0)
// do your things
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this would be an "over complication" IMHO, because now he has to worry about catching the exception; and he never stated he really cared to know that the event occured –  mike.tihonchik Mar 20 '13 at 16:01
    
And throwing an exception is another return path, so you still have multiple returns –  Steve Kuo Mar 21 '13 at 0:22
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If function is long (say, 20 lines or more), then, it is good to return for few error conditions in the beginning so that reader of code can focus on logic when reading rest of the function. If function is small (say 5 lines or less), then return statements in the beginning can be distracting for reader.

So, decision should be based on primarily on whether the function becomes more readable or less readable.

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Java good practices say that, as often as possible, return statements should be unique and written at the end of the method. To control what you return, use a variable. However, for returning from a void method, like the example you use, what I'd do would be perform the check in a middle method used only for such purpose. Anyway, don't take this too serious - keywords like continue should never be used according to Java good practices, but they're there, inside your scope.

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1  
Where is this so called "Java good practice" documented? –  Steve Kuo Mar 20 '13 at 17:00
    
    
I read completely opposite opinions. –  Alex Kreutznaer Mar 20 '13 at 20:22
1  
@JorgeAntonioDíaz-Benito i downvoted because you state the answer as a fact without listing a reference. Personally I would like to see a reference for the best practise. I always enjoy reading about coding styles/coding advice but none of that is currently in your answer. –  Johan Mar 20 '13 at 21:41
1  
@SteveKuo Methods shouldn't be very long. In this case, yes it messes things up. If methods are long it probably means that something is wrong with the code granularity. –  Alex Kreutznaer Mar 21 '13 at 2:34
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