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I have decided to add a caching layer over my domain service layer to increase performance in a system I'm working on.

I've not really worked with caching before, and most of the examples I've seen are really trivial. I'm sure the problem I'm working with is a familiar one, but I haven't been able to track down anything that has helped me yet.

The problem, in a nutshell, is as follows: If I have cached an entity that has relationships to other cached entities, what is the best way to make sure that the cache is always up to date when there is a change to any of them? Note that the entities are detached from their data context when being pulled from the repository.

Here is a quick example:

Domain Objects:

public class Product
{
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int SpecID { get; set; }
    public ProductSpec Spec { get; set; }
}

public class ProductSpec
{
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public IList<Product> Products { get; set; }
    public IList<ProductSpecDrawing> Drawings { get; set; }
}

public class ProductSpecDrawing
{
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public int ProductSpecID { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string FileName { get; set; }
    public ProductSpec Spec { get; set; }
    public IList<ProductSpecDrawingRevision> Revisions { get; set; }
}

Getter method of my cache service:

public override ProductSpec GetProductSpec(int productSpecID)
{
   ProductSpec cachedSpec = cacheStorage.Retrieve("productSpec" + productSpecID);
   if(cachedSpec == null)
   {
       cachedSpec = base.GetProductSpec(productSpecID); //repository lookup
       cacheStorage.Store("productSpec" + productSpecID, cachedSpec);
   }
   return cachedSpec;
}

Similar methods cache/retrieve Product, ProductSpecDrawing, etc.

Now, the problem: if an update is made to a ProductSpecDrawing object, for example, I need to look for and update the cache for any other objects that might reference this one or else I could be looking at stale data. That would look something like this:

public override void RemoveProductSpecDrawing(int specDrawingID)
{
    ProductSpecDrawing drawingToRemove = cacheStorage.Retrieve<ProductSpecDrawing>("specDrawing" + specDrawingID);
    base.RemoveProductSpecDrawing(specDrawingID);
    cacheStorage.Remove(drawingToRemove);

    //have to update productSpec collection because we removed a drawing
    cacheStorage.Store("spec" + drawingToRemove.ProductSpec.ID, base.GetProductSpec(drawingToRemove.ProductSpec.ID);
}

I'm thinking that my way of caching each entity is problematic for a couple of reasons: There are a lot of opportunities for data to become stale (especially as the domain becomes large), and needing to refresh potentially many cached objects after a single update seems like it would negate any performance gains (unless users were only viewing things and not editing them).

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2  
Not that caching is bad, but make sure it is really something you need and want to do. Why do you think you need caching? –  Steven V Mar 20 '13 at 15:45
    
Good question Steven. I could definitely get by without it, but I thought it was a good opportunity to learn how to do it since I'm early on in the development stages of my project. By implementing it in a small section of the project, I try some things out and see what works (and what doesn't). It could be that my project never needs it, as I don't anticipate more than a couple of users simultaneously using the site. I just want to know how to do it correctly. –  Gage Trader Mar 20 '13 at 17:19
    
Did you look at Tracing and Caching Provider Wrappers for Entity Framework? –  Gert Arnold Mar 20 '13 at 19:50
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