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What are the pros and cons of utilizing Named IIFEs within JS code to describe and group related code?

I've been using this "pattern" to lend structure to my more procedural code that gets executed only in one place.


Example

(function hideStuffOnInstantiaton(){
    $('oneThing').hide().removeClass();
    $('#somethign_else').slideUp();
    $('.foo').fadeOut();
}());

I find this preferable to both:

// hide Stuff on Instantiaton
$('oneThing').hide().removeClass();
$('#somethign_else').slideUp();
$('.foo').fadeOut();

since over time the comment may get separated from the code and its not immediately obvious what line(s) the comment applies to

and to:

function hideStuffOnInstantiaton(){
    $('oneThing').hide().removeClass();
    $('#somethign_else').slideUp();
    $('.foo').fadeOut();
};

hideStuffOnInstantiaton();

becuase why separate the function and its execution if its only executed in one place?


Are there any performance, maintainability, testability, or cross-browser considerations when using this pattern? I don't believe I've seen many people use this in the wild butI feel as though it could be very useful

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I would not name my immediately-invoked function. If I see a code like yours I would not expect it to be immediately invoked, because you can have (function a(){ .. });. I would perfer a comment instead. –  TryingToImprove Mar 20 '13 at 17:24
3  
It might be useful for debugging, as the function name will show on the stack trace. Also, this is a compulsory reading on this topic: kangax.github.com/nfe –  bfavaretto Mar 20 '13 at 17:27
    
@bfavaretto - Thanks for the link I'll start digging in. –  Zach L Mar 20 '13 at 17:36
    
@TryingToImprove - Never seen that before, I'm sure the above link will have the answer, but can you explain briefly why you would ever do that without invoking the function? –  Zach L Mar 20 '13 at 17:37
1  
@BishopZ where specifically? Also, why not link directly to coding.smashingmagazine.com/2012/11/05/… ? –  b.long Mar 21 '13 at 19:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
+50

why separate the function and its execution if its only executed in one place?

In that case, there's no reason to use a function (with its overhead) at all - just inline the code. And don't hide comments in function names, I'd call that a bad practise. If someone separates the comment from the code, it's his fault not yours - actually he could pack completely unrelated stuff in your IENFE as well.

While this pattern could be useful if you'd reuse the function (recursively) or need it to build a closure around something, and the named function makes stacktraces easier to debug, there are various bugs in IE. So avoid it if you don't really need it - and you do not.

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That sucks, I love this pattern myself and use it often. Thanks for the info. –  Lucas Green Mar 21 '13 at 17:54

I always thought labels were cool:

hideStuffOnInstantiaton: {
  $('oneThing').hide().removeClass();
  $('#somethign_else').slideUp();
  $('.foo').fadeOut();
}

In reality, it's usually silly to do this. Instead, grouped functionality generally belongs in its own function.

share|improve this answer
    
wow, I sort of remember reading about labels a while ago. They are cool, and seem to make better sense than what I'm suggesting. –  Zach L Mar 21 '13 at 18:21

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