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I am attempting to add a speed boost to a HttpModule that processes images using asynchronous programming.

Whilst it certainly appears that I am getting a performance improvement I'd like to check that I am using the tools provided correctly.

I'm particularly concerned that I am processing the queue incorrectly.

The approach I am taking.

  1. Init the ConcurrentQueue
  2. Add the ProcessImage method to the queue on the BeginEventHandler in AddOnBeginRequestAsync
  3. Process the queue on the EndEventHandler in AddOnBeginRequestAsync

There's a lot of code so my apologies in advance but asynchronous programming is hard:

fields

/// <summary>
/// The thread safe fifo queue.
/// </summary>
private static ConcurrentQueue<Action> imageOperations;

/// <summary>
/// A value indicating whether the application has started.
/// </summary>
private static bool hasAppStarted = false;

httpmodule init

/// <summary>
/// Initializes a module and prepares it to handle requests.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="context">
/// An <see cref="T:System.Web.HttpApplication"/> that provides 
/// access to the methods, properties, and events common to all 
/// application objects within an ASP.NET application
/// </param>
public void Init(HttpApplication context)
{
    if (!hasAppStarted)
    {
        lock (SyncRoot)
        {
            if (!hasAppStarted)
            {
                imageOperations = new ConcurrentQueue<Action>();
                DiskCache.CreateCacheDirectories();
                hasAppStarted = true;
            }
        }
    }

    context.AddOnBeginRequestAsync(OnBeginAsync, OnEndAsync);
    context.PreSendRequestHeaders += this.ContextPreSendRequestHeaders;

}

event handlers

/// <summary>
/// The <see cref="T:System.Web.BeginEventHandler"/>  that starts 
/// asynchronous processing 
/// of the <see cref="T:System.Web.HttpApplication.BeginRequest"/>.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="sender">The source of the event.</param>
/// <param name="e">
/// An <see cref="T:System.EventArgs">EventArgs</see> that contains 
/// the event data.
/// </param>
/// <param name="cb">
/// The delegate to call when the asynchronous method call is complete. 
/// If cb is null, the delegate is not called.
/// </param>
/// <param name="extraData">
/// Any additional data needed to process the request.
/// </param>
/// <returns></returns>
IAsyncResult OnBeginAsync(
object sender, EventArgs e, AsyncCallback cb, object extraData)
{
    HttpContext context = ((HttpApplication)sender).Context;
    EnqueueDelegate enqueueDelegate = new EnqueueDelegate(Enqueue);

    return enqueueDelegate.BeginInvoke(context, cb, extraData);

}

/// <summary>
/// The method that handles asynchronous events such as application events.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="result">
/// The <see cref="T:System.IAsyncResult"/> that is the result of the 
/// <see cref="T:System.Web.BeginEventHandler"/> operation.
/// </param>
public void OnEndAsync(IAsyncResult result)
{
    // An action to consume the ConcurrentQueue.
    Action action = () =>
    {
        Action op;

        while (imageOperations.TryDequeue(out op))
        {
            op();
        }
    };

    // Start 4 concurrent consuming actions.
    Parallel.Invoke(action, action, action, action);
}

delegate and process

/// <summary>
/// The delegate void representing the Enqueue method.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="context">
/// the <see cref="T:System.Web.HttpContext">HttpContext</see> object that 
/// provides references to the intrinsic server objects 
/// </param>
private delegate void EnqueueDelegate(HttpContext context);

/// <summary>
/// Adds the method to the queue.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="context">
/// the <see cref="T:System.Web.HttpContext">HttpContext</see> object that 
/// provides references to the intrinsic server objects 
/// </param>
private void Enqueue(HttpContext context)
{
    imageOperations.Enqueue(() => ProcessImage(context));
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It looks like your ProcessImage method works on the HttpContext, which will be a single instance per call to your HttpModule. The OnBeginAsync of your HttpModule is invoked every web request as necessary, and your delegate is already giving you the logic to perform the asynchronous operation. This means, you don't need 4 concurrent threads, because you only have the one context instance to work on, anyway. And we don't need the ConcurrentQueue because all the work on the context should be completed in the life of the request-response.

To sum up, you don't need ConcurrentQueue because:

  1. Requests through the HttpModule are already concurrent (from the web host architecture).
  2. Each request is working on a single context instance.
  3. You need the work from ProcessImage to be complete on context prior to returning from OnEndAsync.

Instead, you just want to begin the background work of your ProcessImage in the OnBeginAsync method, and then make sure that work is completed in your OnEndAsync method. Also, since all the changes are made directly on the context instance (I'm assuming, since ProcessImage doesn't have a return type, that it is updating context), you don't need to do any further work of getting the result object from your processing.

You can ditch the ConcurrentQueue and simply use:

IAsyncResult OnBeginAsync(object sender, EventArgs e, 
                          AsyncCallback cb, object extraData)
{
    HttpContext context = ((HttpApplication)sender).Context;
    EnqueueDelegate enqueueDelegate = new EnqueueDelegate(ProcessImage);

    return enqueueDelegate.BeginInvoke(context, cb, extraData);
}

public void OnEndAsync(IAsyncResult result)
{
    // Ensure our ProcessImage has completed in the background.
    while (!result.IsComplete)
    {
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(1); 
    }
}

You can remove ConcurrentQueue<Action> imageOperations and Enqueue and you could also rename EnqueueDelegate to be ProcessImageDelegate since it works directly with that method, now.

Note: It may be that your context is not ready for the ProcessImage at the time of OnBeginAsync. If that is the case, you will have to move ProcessImage as a simple synchronous call within OnEndAsync. However, that said, there is real possibility that the ProcessImage can be improved through some concurrency.

One other nitpicky point I'd make is that hasAppStarted could be renamed hasModuleInitialized to be less ambiguous.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that, Yeah I'll definitely change the field name. :) You've pretty much picked up on the thing I was bothered about in OnEndAsync I got the 4 threads bit from a sample on MSDN and I wasn't sure whether it was either beneficial or detrimental to my process. Having said that, reducing the process to one thread seems to have sped up my test page by ~20%. Would that make sense to keep just one or could you suggest a way that more threads could be used in a more beneficial way? –  James South Mar 20 '13 at 19:11
    
Thanks for that... Unfortunately your edit seems to have broken something. The images are certainly getting processed and saved to the file system but are now getting served back to the browser in the raw unprocessed form. –  James South Mar 20 '13 at 20:17
    
Yeah that makes sense. Back to the drawing board if I want more speed :/ –  James South Mar 20 '13 at 20:46
1  
@JamesSouth After review, it seems a ConcurrentQueue isn't even necessary, since (1) requests through the HttpModule are already concurrent, (2) you only have the one context per request, and (3) you need the one context to be processed prior to returning from OnEndAsync. –  Mike Guthrie Mar 20 '13 at 21:09
    
That looks like it's working. Thanks so much for that I was starting to worry. –  James South Mar 20 '13 at 23:25

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