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I have been editing and expanding a Calculator class off of a book. However, the book wants me to add the following methods:

-(double) memoryClear;//clear memory
-(double) memoryStore;//set memory to accumulator
-(double) memoryRecall;//set accumulator to memory
-(double) memoryAdd: (double) value;//add value into memory
-(double) memorySubtract: (double) value;//subtract value from memory

I successfully declared and defined these methods, but I keep getting 2 semantic errors saying that I'm not using the last two methods listed (memoryAdd & memorySubtract) In the following code, I'm aware that I'm not using memorySubtract, but I am using memoryAdd and it still gives me the error.

   #import <Foundation/Foundation.h>
@interface Calculator: NSObject

//accumulator methods
-(void) setAccumulator: (double) value;
-(void) clear;
-(double) accumulator;
-(double) changeSign;//changes the sign of the accumulator
-(double) reciprocal;//1/accumulator
-(double) xSquared;//accumulator squared
-(void) memoryClear;//clear memory
-(double) memoryStore;//set memory to accumulator
-(double) memoryRecall;//set accumulator to memory
-(double) memoryAdd: (double) value;//add value into memory
-(double) memorySubtract: (double) value;//subtract value from memory

//arithmetic methods
-(double) add: (double) value;
-(double) subtract: (double) value;
-(double) multiply: (double) value;
-(double) divide: (double) value;

@end

@implementation Calculator

{
    double accumulator;
    double memory;

}

-(void) setAccumulator:(double)value
{
    accumulator = value;
}
-(void) clear
{
    accumulator = 0;
}
-(double) changeSign
{
    accumulator = 15.6;
    return accumulator;
}
-(double) reciprocal
{
  accumulator =  1/accumulator;
    return accumulator;
}
-(double) xSquared
{
    accumulator = accumulator * accumulator;
    return accumulator;
}
-(double) accumulator
{
    return accumulator;
}
-(double) add:(double)value
{
    accumulator += value;
    return value;
}
-(double) subtract:(double)value
{
    accumulator -= value;
    return value;
}
-(double) multiply:(double)value
{
    accumulator *= value;
    return value;
}
-(double) divide:(double)value
{
    accumulator /= value;
    return value;
}
-(double) memoryStore
{
    memory = accumulator;
    return memory;
}
-(void) memoryClear
{
    accumulator = 0;
}
-(double) memoryRecall
{
    accumulator = memory;
    return memory;
}
-(double) memoryAdd:(double)value
{
    value = memory;
    value + memory;
    return memory;
}
-(double) memorySubtract:(double)value
{
    value = memory;
    value - memory;
    return memory;

}


@end


int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{

    @autoreleasepool {
        Calculator *deskCalc = [[Calculator alloc] init];

        [deskCalc setAccumulator: 100.0];
        [deskCalc xSquared];
        [deskCalc add:200.0];
        [deskCalc divide:15.0];
        [deskCalc subtract:10.0];
        [deskCalc multiply: 5];
        [deskCalc memoryStore];
        [deskCalc memoryRecall];
        [deskCalc memoryAdd:19.87654321];
        //note that %f or %g can be used universally to identify a double and float variables
        NSLog(@"The result is %.f",[deskCalc accumulator]);
        /*the "." between the "%" and "f" means that the output should not go to 0th decimal place or not show a decimal at all */



    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
what you mean by this "I've been getting along quite well until this" plze explain it well –  Ramshad Mar 20 '13 at 17:56
    
What have you tried? –  Richard Brown Mar 20 '13 at 17:57
    
You declared them already. What is your question? –  Hermann Klecker Mar 20 '13 at 18:09
    
Normally I would guess that is makes more sense returning the accumulator instead of the parameter value. But that is pointless while you do not use the returned value anyway. Why do you return something at all? –  Hermann Klecker Mar 20 '13 at 18:10

1 Answer 1

Back in the olden days calculators were all we had to work with. A calculator with memory allowed you to store a value for later calculation. To implement this you need to:

Add an instance variable

double memory;

This will keep track of the memory value for you.

-(double) memoryStore {
  memory = accumulator;
}

-(void) memoryRecall {
  accumulator = memory;
}

-(void) memoryClear {
  memory = 0;
}

I'll leave the last two for you as an exercise.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm sorry to all that I confused!!! I am a new semi-new programmer. My question was how should I DEFINE the following methods, not declare...Thankfully, the question was already answered –  user1706978 Mar 21 '13 at 17:41
    
wouldn't the memoryRecall method have to return a double value too? –  user1706978 Mar 26 '13 at 17:04
    
I edited my question...I have a new problem;read above –  user1706978 Mar 26 '13 at 17:31
    
memoryAdd should say memory += value; instead of value + memory; value + memory; does absolutely nothing. Why are your methods returning values? You don't use the returned value anywhere. –  Richard Brown Mar 26 '13 at 19:52
    
okay! Thank you so much! shouldn't memoryRecall return a double though? –  user1706978 Mar 26 '13 at 22:49

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