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I am trying to scale images based on browser height.

It seems to be working in Chrome and Safari, but when I check it in Firefox, the images just remain their original sizes.

Here's the code that I have so far.

HTML:

<div class="full-width">
    <div class="image-wrapper">
        <div class="images">
            <img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7165/6840151639_b31263de71_b_d.jpg" />
            <img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7165/6840151639_b31263de71_b_d.jpg" />
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

CSS:

.full-width {
    height: 100%;
    width: 100%;
    position: absolute;
}

.image-wrapper {
    position: absolute;
    right: 0;
    width: 50%;
    height: 55%;
    margin-right: 15px;
}

.images {
    position: absolute;
    right: 0;
}

.image-wrapper img {
    display: block;
    height: auto;
    max-height: 50%;
    width: auto\9; /* ie8 */
}

You can view a working example here: http://jsfiddle.net/Pywak/

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3 Answers 3

All your absolute positioning breaks proportional size calculations. There's no longer a parent/child relationship among your elements.

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Giving position:absolute; without position:relative; to a parent Container is always going to land you in problem, when you resize the browser or when the screen resolution changes.

I would suggest that instead of img tags you use them as background-images and then use the background:contain; || background:cover; property.

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I do have another outter div #wrap that already has position: relative; –  mousesports Mar 20 '13 at 18:22

I was just working through the same issue!

Since percentage is relative to the parent element, it's key that the direct parent has an explicitly specified height. So, .images should have a height specified in order for its children to size properly by percentage.

You can also size the height with vh units (relative to viewport height), but carefully and with fallbacks, as vh is not compatible with all browsers.

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