Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to update a table data in database using RAILS migrations.

Sample:
Table: Table_A(Col_A(number), Col_B(varchar),...)
Query: UPDATE Table_A SET Col_B = "XXX" where Col_B = "YYY"

What would be the best way to do this using RAILS Migrations. I am not even sure if RAILS migrations is the way to go for updating data in database. Any explanation would be helpful.

share|improve this question
    
I will refer to the 2nd answer on this previous question about why is bad to change data with migrations: stackoverflow.com/questions/849897/… –  fmendez Mar 20 '13 at 18:17

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's usually better to do these sorts of big data updates in a rake task. I usually write them so they have two versions: rake change_lots_of_data:report and rake change_lots_of_data:update. The 'report' version just executes the where clause and spits out a list of what would be changed. The 'update' version uses the very same where clause but makes the changes.

Some advantages of doing it this way are:

  • Migrations are saved for changing the database structure
  • You can run the 'report' version as often as you want to make sure the right records are going to be updated.
  • It's easier to unit test the class called by the rake task.
  • If you ever need to apply the same criteria to make the change again, you can just run the rake task again. It's possible but trickier to do that with migrations.
share|improve this answer
    
Wholeheartedly agree here. Big data-updates are best left to rake tasks. I've had some headaches trying to do this kind of thing in a migration that's followed by other migrations that alter the DB structure ever-so-slightly making the consecutive runs of migrations fail explosively. –  nzifnab Mar 20 '13 at 18:29

You can do like this:

 class YourMigration < ActiveRecord::Migration
   def up    
     execute('UPDATE Table_A SET Col_B = "XXX" where Col_B = "YYY"')
   end

   def down
   end
 end

Or:

 class YourMigration < ActiveRecord::Migration
   def up   
     update('UPDATE Table_A SET Col_B = "XXX" where Col_B = "YYY"')
   end

   def down
   end
 end
share|improve this answer

I prefer to do any database data changes in a rake task so that's it's

  1. Obvious
  2. Repeatable
  3. Won't later be executed via rake db:migrate

namespace :update do

  desc "Update table A to set Col_B to YYY"
  task :table_a => :environment do
    TableA.where(Col_B: "YYY").update_all(Col_B: "XXX")
  end
end

Then you can rake update:table_a to execute the update.

share|improve this answer
    
Grr, can't get it to accept the namespace line as code. :p –  Richard Brown Mar 20 '13 at 18:49

This should be done in a rake task...

namespace :onetime do
  task :update_my_data => :environment do
    TableA.where(Col_B: "YYY").update_all(Col_B: "XXX")
  end
end

Then after you deploy:

rake onetime:update_my_data

At my company we delete the contents of the onetime namespace rake task after it's been run in production. Just a convention for us I guess.

More details about the update_all method: http://apidock.com/rails/ActiveRecord/Relation/update_all

share|improve this answer
    
You are wrong. There is no mention of Model for table. And it is bad to use Model in migration. –  codeit Mar 20 '13 at 18:15
1  
Isn't that why I said "if your tables have a model"??? How do we know his table doesn't have a model? I would argue it's bad to do any kind of mass-update in a migration. Just make a rake task. –  nzifnab Mar 20 '13 at 18:16
    
If the table does have a model associated with it, which is better, using execute or using the above mentioned way. –  kanap008 Mar 20 '13 at 18:20
    
Still using execute is better in my view. Because using model is dangerous. –  codeit Mar 20 '13 at 18:21
    
I would say my version in a rake task, execute version in a migration. Personally I'd prefer the rake task... –  nzifnab Mar 20 '13 at 18:21
ActiveRecord::Base.connection.execute("update Table_A set Col_B = 'XXX'  where Col_B = 'YYY')
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.