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I'm using asp.net mvc with entity framework and starting to learn DDD. I'm working on project that contains surveys. Here's my domain model:

public class Survey
{
    public int? SurveyID { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public decimal MinAcceptanceScore { get; set; }
    public int UserFailsCount { get; set; }

    public IEnumerable<SurveyQuestion> Questions { get; set; }
    public IEnumerable<Prize> Prizes { get; set; }
    public IEnumerable<SurveyAttempt> UserAttempts { get; set; }
}

I need different parts of surveys for different views so I've created different ViewModels:

    public class ShortSurveyViewModel
    {
        public int? SurveyID { get; set; }
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public int UserFailsCount { get; set; }
        public IEnumerable<SurveyAttempt> UserAttempts { get; set; }
    }

    public class ShortSurveyWithPrizesViewModel
    {
        public int? SurveyID { get; set; }
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public int UserFailsCount { get; set; }
        public IEnumerable<SurveyAttempt> UserAttempts { get; set; }
        public IEnumerable<Prize> Prizes { get; set; }
    }

    public class SurveyEditViewModel
    {
        public int? SurveyID { get; set; }
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public decimal MinAcceptanceScore { get; set; }
        public int UserFailsCount { get; set; }

        public IEnumerable<SurveyQuestion> Questions { get; set; }
        public IEnumerable<Prize> Prizes { get; set; }
    }

What would be the best way to build my architecture if I want my survey repository to get information needed for appropriete view model?

Different solusions that I see:

  1. Repository could return IQueryable to SurveyService and service could return the appropriete view model, but I hesitate that doing this is right because I think view models should be created in UI, not Service layer.

  2. Create three appropriate classes in my domain layer. But now domain will be dependent from representation and with each new view new domain class should be created.

  3. Retrieve full domain object and map just properties that needed for particular view. This is not good because in my example Questions only needed in one representation and it could be heavy collection.

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1  
use partial views –  Dave Alperovich Mar 20 '13 at 18:30
1  
ViewModels should live in the UI and get populated in the controller. DAL and Domain layers should have no knowledge of them –  Forty-Two Mar 20 '13 at 18:31
    
@DaveA I will use partial views, but the question is not about it. I'm asking about optimal way to build my view models. –  Oleksii Aza Mar 20 '13 at 18:37
2  
@Forty-Two: Why? What makes those "view models" so special? If I strip the ViewModel from class names I see just data transport objects which can be created anywhere. –  Ladislav Mrnka Mar 20 '13 at 18:45
1  
@LadislavMrnka I'm just trying to imply that the purpose of the view models the OP describes are to pass data to the view, therefore they would seemingly belong in the presentation layer. Though you are completely correct that they are really just dto's and could live anywhere you want. From my (limited) experience keeping view models in the presentation layer and handling mapping and populating in the controller is a good way to help keep complexity low, especially for beginner developers. –  Forty-Two Mar 20 '13 at 18:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Domain driven design:

  • You should have a repository returning aggregate root - in your case Survey and all relations which cannot exist without parent Survey
  • This repository will load always whole Survey class and depending on your requirements just some relations (the really dogmatic DDD would always load whole aggregate but that is not a good approach for stateless web).
  • Your application layer (controller) will ask repository for Survey and selected relations and fills view models.

Onion architecture:

  • You will create some repository exposing IQueryable<Survey> - even worse you will use generic repository with CRUD interface
  • You will create some service calling repository and building Linq-to-entities projection into your DTOs and returning them to application layer (controller)
  • Now what? You can either use those DTOs directly or use another set of objects used as your view models with some UI related attributes etc. There is obviously something wrong ...

Simple architecture:

  • You will use injected IDbSet<Survey> directly in your controller as a repository
  • You will make Linq-to-entities projections directly in your controller to fill view models

There is no best way. It is always about your goal and about your expectations. For small applications you can live with simple architecture without any issue.

Domain driven design is more complex. The main concept in DDD are domain entities, value objects and their composition. Domain entity encapsulates data and logic executed on those data. DDD does not work with partial data or DTOs - when your domain entities don't have any logic you are doing it wrong (it is called anemic model). The service in DDD is not mediator between application layer and repository. It is used to handle business logic which is not related to single domain entity (so cannot be encapsulate in domain entity). Repository is infrastructure code needed to materialize your aggregates from storage and to persist them in storage. Application logic (controller) can interact with domain entities, services and infrastructure code.

I don't like onion architecture.

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This is a well thought out explanation. I wonder if you could elaborate on why you don't like the onion architecture and possibly explain why there is obviously something wrong... I don't have enough experience yet for it to be obvious to me. Also I don't fully understand the difference between the third bullet under DDD and the third bullet under Onion. Aren't you essentially in the same place, that is, a controller now in possession of Domain objects (Entities in one case and DTO's in the other) that it will map to the view models? I'm not playing devils advocate, just trying to learn. –  Forty-Two Mar 20 '13 at 19:42
    
Thank you, Ladislav. Very informative answer. But I can't understand why you don't like onion architecture. From your answer I got that it could be the best choise, because Simple architecture don't fit my needs and DDD could be not good for stateless web. And if it would be not the really dogmatic DDD could have some properties of Survey not filled with data? –  Oleksii Aza Mar 20 '13 at 19:47
1  
@Forty-Two: It is just my personal opinion from previous experience. Onion architecture in my opinion leads to redundant layers. I even worked on projects where those layers were divided into sub layers. At the end of the project we had just plenty of code where upper layer methods have just single line of code calling lower layer. Any additional functionality required updating so many files just to propagate something up. It really wasn't good. –  Ladislav Mrnka Mar 20 '13 at 19:57
1  
@Forty-Two: The third bullet is not the same because in DDD you are returning domain aggregate but in onion architecture you have already made one projection into DTO and know you have to make the decision if DTO is view model and if you should mark it with some UI related attributes or if you make another class for your view model. If your service didn't perform anything else than projection you made just redundant layer and perhaps also redundant DTO. –  Ladislav Mrnka Mar 20 '13 at 19:59
    
@AlexeyAza: I didn't write that DDD is not good for stateless web. I wrote that dogmatic approach is not good for stateless web. If you don't load all necessary properties you may break logic of your domain object because it will be dependent on data you didn't load. It leads back to some more refactored variant of simple architecture. –  Ladislav Mrnka Mar 20 '13 at 20:02

Considering the fact that your primary concern is the amount of data retrieved from the Data Model vs. the amount of data necessary in the View Model, I would say the right approach for you would be to build Views in the database and their respective Data Models.

This would allow you to prune the amount of data leveraged from the database on any one trip.

Though the Data Models would nearly mimic the View Models, that's not a problem, they serve two distinct purposes. The View Model is for the View to bind to - the Data Model knows how to get and save data. Building these views would allow you to get data in the optimal way - and yet house custom save logic in those same models to make them writable if necessary - thus a need arises for the Data Model past moving data from one tier to the next.

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Did I understand you correctly that I should have two exact models (one in data layer, another in presentation) and if I change one, another will be changed too? –  Oleksii Aza Mar 20 '13 at 19:12
    
@AlexeyAza: you will have two models, the data model (in the data layer) and the view model (in the presentation layer with the controllers) but the key is that I think you're going to want to build Views in the database rather than just grabbing data from the table all the time. That means you're going to have data models that match Views and the view models will probably look a lot like those data models. When you can pull data directly from the table, use the standard data model for your table, and map to a view model. –  Michael Perrenoud Mar 20 '13 at 19:16
    
Maybe it makes sense. But let's imagine the situation where my Questions have paging. Where would you apply it? –  Oleksii Aza Mar 20 '13 at 19:33

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