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I am writing a python script which calculates various quantities based on two parameters, the long radius and short radius of a spheroid. It occurred to me that I could write a spheroid class to do this. However, I'm new to object oriented design and wonder if you more experienced chaps can help me.

An instance is instantiated with parameters a and b for the long radius and short radius respectively, so I've designed the class as follows:

class Spheroid:
  def __init__(self,a,b):
    self.longax  = a
    self.shortax = b

One of the quantities I want to calculate is the volume. The volume of a spheroid is 4*pi/3 * a * b * b.

My question is, do I define a method or an attribute for this in my class?

e.g. I could define a method:

def Volume(self):
  return 4*pi/3 * self.longax * self.shortax * self.shortax

or I could just use an attribute:

self.volume = 4*pi/3 * self.longax * self.shortax * self.shortax

I could also just include it in the init method:

class Spheroid:
  def __init__(self,a,b):
    self.longax  = a
    self.shortax = b
    self.volume = 4*pi/3 * a * b * b.

Which is better to use and why? In general, when would I use a method and when would I use an attribute? I wouldn't normally care but I have a whole load of these to implement and I'd like to have an idea about OO design for future reference.

Thanks

EDIT:

After implementing properties as per Martijn's suggestion, I ended up with something like this:

class Spheroid(object):
  def __init__(self,a,b):
    self.shortax = a
    self.longax  = b
    self.alpha=self.longax/self.shortax

    @property
    def volume(self):
        return (4*np.pi/3) * self.shortax * self.shortax * self.longax

    @property
    def epsilon(self):
        return np.sqrt(1-self.alpha**(-2))

    @property
    def geometricaspect(self):
        return 0.5 + np.arcsin(self.epsilon)*0.5*self.alpha/self.epsilon

    @property
    def surfacearea(self):
        return 4*np.pi*self.shortax**2*self.geometricaspect

I instantiated an instance s = Spheroid() but whenever I try something like s.volume or s.epsilon I get an AttributeError:

AttributeError: 'Spheroid' object has no attribute 'volume'

What am I doing wrong here?

Also, in my init method I used self.alpha = self.longax/self.shortax instead of a/b, does this make any difference? Is one way preferable?

share|improve this question
1  
Excellent question. Note this the tradeoffs are language dependent. One answer might be obvious in C++ with a different answer in Python. –  Robᵩ Mar 20 '13 at 18:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You have a 3rd option: make it both an attribute and a method, by using a property:

class Spheroid(object):
    def __init__(self, a, b):
        self.long  = a
        self.short = b

    @property
    def volume(self):
        return 4 * pi / 3 * self.long * self.short * self.short

You access .volume like an attribute:

>>> s = Spheroid(2, 3)
>>> s.volume
75.39822368615503

In order for the property descriptor to work correctly, in Python 2 you need to make sure your class inherits from object; in Python 3 the baseclass can be safely omitted.

In this case, the calculation of the volume is cheap enough, but a property lets you postpone having to calculate the volume until you actually need it.

The above example creates a read-only property; only a getter is defined:

>>> s.volume = None
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AttributeError: can't set attribute

You could easily cache the result of the property calculation:

class Spheroid(object):
    _volume = None

    def __init__(self, a, b):
        self.long  = a
        self.short = b

    @property
    def volume(self):
        if self._volume is None:
            self._volume = 4 * pi / 3 * self.long * self.short * self.short
        return self._volume

so that you only have to calculate it once per Spheroid instance.

What you use depends on many factors; how easy does your API need to be to use, how often will the volume be calculated, how many Spheroid instances will be created, etc. If you create a million of these in a loop but only ever need the volume for a handfull of them, it makes sense to use a property instead of setting the volume in the __init__.

If, however, your class could adjust itself based on the volume; say, by adjusting one of the radii automatically, then a @property makes more sense still:

class Spheroid(object):
    def __init__(self, a, b):
        self.long  = a
        self.short = b

    @property
    def volume(self):
        return 4 * pi / 3 * self.long * self.short * self.short

    @volume.setter
    def volume(self, newvolume):
        # adjust the short radius
        self.short = sqrt(newvolume / (4 * pi / 3 * self.long))

Now you have a spheroid which naturally adjusts it's short attribute as you adjust the volume:

>>> s = Spheroid(2, 1)
>>> s.volume
8.377580409572781
>>> s.volume = 75.39822368615503
>>> s.long, s.short
(2, 3.0)

Note: technically, anything you access on an object with .name notation is an attribute; methods included. For the purpose of this answer, I used your attribute as any value that is not called (doesn't use () after the name).

share|improve this answer
    
damnit beat me to it. –  Jonathan Vanasco Mar 20 '13 at 18:32
    
You might want to mention that another benefit of this is that volume is "read-only" as well. –  mgilson Mar 20 '13 at 18:32
    
i included caching with my answer though... –  Jonathan Vanasco Mar 20 '13 at 18:33
    
@JonathanVanasco: That is the next step; it is not a requirement :-) –  Martijn Pieters Mar 20 '13 at 18:36
    
Hi Martijn, thanks for your post. Can you explain why defining a property is better than just using a method? With a method, I would also delay the calculation of the volume until I call the method, no? –  user1654183 Mar 20 '13 at 21:10

will you always use this data?

if not, you could use a property and then lazily compute it...

class Spheroid(object):
  def __init__(self,a,b):
    self.longax  = a
    self.shortax = b
    self._volume = None

  @property
  def volume(self):
      if self._volume is None :
           self._volume = 4*pi/3 * self.longax * self.shortax * self.shortax
      return self._volume
share|improve this answer
    
If you change self._volume = ... to self.volume = ..., then you avoid subsequent function calls. –  Robᵩ Mar 20 '13 at 18:37
    
@Robᵩ In Python2.7, which I use, it raises an AttributeError. [ and I've wished so often that I could do that ] –  Jonathan Vanasco Mar 20 '13 at 18:40
    
@Robᵩ: No, you cannot. Data descriptors (like a property) are first looked up on the class and cannot be replaced by a instance attribute. –  Martijn Pieters Mar 20 '13 at 18:43
    
You are both correct, I was wrong. I tested with old-style classes, which test wasn't valid. Thanks. –  Robᵩ Mar 20 '13 at 18:47

I would implement volume as a method because of the following:

  1. it can be computed from other attributes, so it saves space to compute it (unless this is very complicated computation and than you can consider caching it)
  2. it is not a natural "feature" of the object, for example for circle the radius is an attribute but not the area (this is not really format definition)
  3. Something like volume is kind of abstract method, if you want to have family of objects and compute the volume for each of them in polymorphic way.
share|improve this answer
    
Can you elaborate on the "saves space" argument? –  Robᵩ Mar 20 '13 at 18:36
    
if you save it as field, you have an extra integer per object –  eran Mar 20 '13 at 18:53

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