Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I've been trying to create a class that handles 1000 linked lists, and initially declares pointers to them.

This is the code that deals directly with my issues:

struct node
{
    char name[40];
    char numb[12];
    node * next;
};
class hashTable
{
public:
    //Creates a table of 1000 pointers to linked-list nodes
    node * table[1000];

//Functions
void addNode(char name[40], char numb[12])
{
    node * temp;        //Initializes temp node as pointer
    temp = new node;    //Points temp node to a new node

    int hash = h(g(name));  //The hash of the key (name) used to check nodes
    temp = table[hash];     //sets the temporary node to the first node of the list

    while (temp->next != 0)
    {
//...

Right at the while loop is where I get the error "Access violation reading location 0xcccccd00" I'm not sure why it can't access the table member, unless perhaps it is because these values have not been initialized or anything?

share|improve this question
1  
Perhaps it is because these values have not been initialized or anything? –  Thomas Mar 20 '13 at 18:52
1  
or hash > 1000 ? –  Smash Mar 20 '13 at 18:54
1  
I would say this is an offset from uninitialized memory. Since 0xcccccccc means uninitialized in the VC debug mode. stackoverflow.com/questions/127386/… –  drescherjm Mar 20 '13 at 18:57
1  
Site note: change that table size to either 997 or 1009. –  WhozCraig Mar 20 '13 at 18:57
    
Do you NULL all 1000 pointers in table[]? It seems like you do not since you do not check for that. Wait a min shouldn't temp = table[hash]; be table[hash]=temp; –  drescherjm Mar 20 '13 at 18:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're likely not doing two things. First make sure your hash table is properly initialized to contain all-NULL-pointers. Secondly, make sure any pointer retrieved from the hash table is valid prior to dereferencing it:

For the first issue:

hashTable::hashTable() : table()
{
}

Also, you want to make sure this thing cleans up properly

hashTable::~hashTable()
{
    for (size_t i=0;i<sizeof(table)/sizeof(table[0]); ++i)
    {
        node *temp = table[i];
        while (temp)
        {
            node *victim = temp;
            temp = temp->next;
            delete victim;
        }
    }
}

For the second issue:

void addNode(const char *name, const char *numb)
{
    int hash = h(g(name));    //The hash of the key (name) used to check nodes
    node *temp = table[hash]; //sets the temporary node to the first node of the list

    if (temp)
    {
        // preexisting entry. walk that list looking for matching key.
        node **pp = &temp->next;
        while (temp)
        {
            if (0 == strcmp(temp->name, name))
                break;
            pp = &temp->next;
            temp = temp->next;
        }

        // link to last node if not found in list
        if (!temp)
            *pp = new node(name, numb);
    }
    else
    {   // no prior entry. create a new one and store it at table[hash].
        table[hash] = new node(name, numb);
    }
}

Note: the above code assumes the node class is implemented as

struct node
{
    char name[40];
    char numb[12];
    node * next;

    node(const char* name_, const char *numb_)
        : next()
    {
        strncpy(name, name_, sizeof(name)/sizeof(name[0])-1);
        name[ sizeof(name)/sizeof(name[0])-1 ] = 0;
        strncpy(numb, numb_, sizeof(numb)/sizeof(numb[0])-1);
        numb[ sizeof(numb)/sizeof(numb[0])-1 ] = 0;
    }
};

Personally, I'd use std::string

share|improve this answer
    
This seems more likely than my guess. As a result temp = new node; makes no sense in this case. –  drescherjm Mar 20 '13 at 19:08
    
Thank you very much for the detailed answer. It's starting to make sense now. :) –  DatapawWolf Mar 20 '13 at 19:48
    
Erhm, one last thing. Using the code to initialize the pointers to NULL, this "if (temp)" is now never false, when I use the same exact entry more than once. –  DatapawWolf Mar 20 '13 at 20:26
1  
@KevSana It will be false the first time a slot is mapped and collision list exists yet. After that, the initial node in each slot added is always the first node of that slot's collection list. That is the point of a collision list to begin with. By the way, you can make this significantly faster if you sort the collection list as well, but that would change the layout of your hash table, requiring a array pointer and list size per slot. If speed were the end-goal, it is worth considering. –  WhozCraig Mar 20 '13 at 21:19

If the value of hash is greater than (or equal to) 1000, temp will point to an invalid area.

And you are leaking the memory allocated by new node since you are overwriting the temp variable.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.