Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a way I can cancel a dispose from within the Dispose method, in other words NOT dispose A when A.Dispose() is called.

Update I didn't explain well, 'cos I couldn't think of a way to put it nicely. What I have is a class that displays a progress bar (marquee) in a popup window that runs in a separate thread. When the progress popup is created, a controller-like disposable object is returned, so we can do something like this:

using (var progress = Dialogs.ShowProgress("Please wait..."))
{
    // do lots of stuff here
    progress.UpdateStatus("Please wait some more...");
    // do more stuff
}

when the using block exits, the progress window is closed and destroyed.

Now I have situations where things that happen within this block also create a progress window and instead of returning a new object and creating a new window, I wanted to return the object created by the first instance, and only destroy it once the first instance disposes.

Update Ok, what I did was to create a new IDisposable object with each Dialogs.ShowProgress() call, and attached the original controller object to it. These objects get disposed of whenever they're done, and the controller only gets disposed when it's the only object left to dispose.

share|improve this question
3  
Why in the world would you want to do that? Basically you're asking "I have this contract that says I must do X, but I don't want to - how do I get out of it?" –  JerKimball Mar 20 '13 at 19:23
2  
I smell framework abuse here. If the entire .NET framework doesn't have the need to cancel a Dispose() call do you think you really need to? –  Sten Petrov Mar 20 '13 at 19:23
1  
You are confusing the Dispose method, which is a convention (widely used across the .NET Framework, but not a language thing, just a convention), with a finalizer (which has a different syntax), and still you can't cancel a finalizer (which makes no sense)... the way to "cancel" Dispose is just... not calling Dispose. –  Jcl Mar 20 '13 at 19:30
2  
@Jcl: Actually there is a way to "cancel" a finalizer. When the GC categorizes a reference as "dead and needing finalization" it puts it in the finalizer queue, at which point it becomes "alive" again. If the finalizer causes the reference to the object to remain alive then you have a bona fide alive object again that the GC will not clean up until it is dead again. (And in fact, the object can mark itself as "treat me as though I was never finalized" if it wants the finalizer to run again the second time it is dead.) These techniques are for advanced players only. –  Eric Lippert Mar 20 '13 at 20:09
2  
@Jcl: You can do it with ordinary C#. Pooling strategies often use this technique. When the object is about to be released by the GC, the GC puts it on the finalizer queue and when the finalizer runs, it puts the object right back in the pool, making it alive, and tells the object "you still haven't been finalized" so that the next time it goes around this karmic cycle, it gets resurrected again. –  Eric Lippert Mar 20 '13 at 23:55
show 4 more comments

5 Answers

As others have said, it's a bad idea to implement IDisposable in a way that might not really dispose. Here's an alternate way to implement what you're trying to do:

interface IMaybeDisposable
{
    bool TryDispose(); //return false if dispose was canceled
}

You might use it like:

IMaybeDisposable maybe = //something
try
{
    // do something with maybe
}
finally
{
    if (maybe.TryDispose())
        // yay, it disposed!
    else
        // hm, it didn't dispose; do something else
}
share|improve this answer
2  
+1 This is actually a credible solution that avoids misplacing your object in using –  Sten Petrov Mar 20 '13 at 19:34
3  
+1 It is still questionable when someone would actually need this, but at least this interface clearly communicates what is going on. –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 20 '13 at 19:35
1  
@DanielHilgarth I agree. Needing this points at bad design somewhere else –  Sten Petrov Mar 20 '13 at 19:36
3  
Perhaps rename the method TryDispose to make it clearer still that it's not the regular dispose. As is one could easily call this Dispose and not realize there is a return value. –  Servy Mar 20 '13 at 19:36
    
@Servy I like that, and have added that to my answer. Thanks! –  Tim S. Mar 20 '13 at 19:39
add comment

Sure. Just don't do whatever you would have done to dispose the object. You don't need to actively do anything special.

Be careful though; when someone disposes of an object they expect it to actually dispose of it's unmanaged resources, rather than ignoring you and holding into them anyway.

share|improve this answer
1  
That type of code is what makes me want to go hunting with the ClueBat... –  JerKimball Mar 20 '13 at 19:24
    
In what way does this not answer the question exactly as asked? –  Servy Mar 20 '13 at 19:25
    
Oh, I'm not knocking you at all, @Servy - the OP question was my target there, sorry :) –  JerKimball Mar 20 '13 at 19:27
    
@JerKimball Yep, that's why I didn't reply to you. It was directed at those downvoting the answer. –  Servy Mar 20 '13 at 19:27
    
There, I can pop you back to null, at least :) –  JerKimball Mar 20 '13 at 19:55
add comment

The required post-condition for Dispose is that the client code should be able to abandon all references to the object without causing any necessary cleanup to go uncompleted. If that condition applies before Dispose is called, then the Dispose method may legitimately do nothing. If that condition does not apply, Dispose must make it do so, and may not legitimately return unless or until it does [note that Dispose need not actually perform the cleanup, if it sets in motion a chain of events via which the cleanup will occur at some later time]. Nothing in the contract for the Dispose interface allows it to sometimes leave objects in a state requiring further cleanup unless it has reason to believe that cleanup will occur via some other means.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I would be careful about doing this. If you cancel disposing a method at the end of a using block, then you've lost the reference to that object and you'll never have a chance to have it dispose of its contents again, meaning that you could leak resources if you're not careful. In particular, I would only do this myself if the dispose method released references to large objects that I didn't want garbage collected right away for whatever reason. I wouldn't do this to skip releasing handles to files, database connections, network sockets, or anything else that can't be garbage collected.

As the commenters pointed out, I would try to refactor my code so that whatever problem I was trying to solve by canceling the dispose would be solved some other, less dangerous way.

If you're absolutely sure that you have an edge condition where you need to skip disposing something, here's one way to do it:

public void Dispose()
{
     if(condition)
     {
         // do disposing stuff
     }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for explaining why it is a bad idea to do that. –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 20 '13 at 19:28
1  
still horrible idea, despite the explanation. using doesn't support conditionally disposable objects –  Sten Petrov Mar 20 '13 at 19:29
1  
@StenPetrov !condition is itself a type of condition, so your code is exactly the same. –  Servy Mar 20 '13 at 19:29
2  
@Servy and I did that too. But there's a common 'expectation bias' which would still mislead a person who asked a question to pick up a wrong answer rather than considering their question being wrong –  Sten Petrov Mar 20 '13 at 19:33
1  
@StenPetrov If your goal was to convey that rather than having Dispose conditionally dispose of the object, the code should be refactored so that the caller simply conditionally calls dispose on that object, then you should say that, as you didn't convey it particularly clearly in your comment. If that's what you meant, then I'd say that might be a valid solution, and it's certainly better than what the OP is asking, although without knowing the context it's hard to discuss what's truly appropriate. –  Servy Mar 20 '13 at 19:34
show 3 more comments

Based on your update, I would do something like this:

 public  void  DoStuff()
{
     DoPrepWork();
     using( var  controller =  TheMethodYouWroteThatShouldReturnAController())
    {
         DoStuffOverControllerLifetime();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is nice, but the stuff that's creating the nested usings could also be called elsewhere where they would then be the creators of the initial controller. Of course, I could also be misunderstanding your answer. –  bixarrio Mar 20 '13 at 20:42
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.