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I'm trying extremely hard to achieve this tutorial here but without using SDL. ie. only using OpenGL to draw the graphics and normal C++ to check for collision.

Below is my attempt, but still doesn't work correctly. I just can't see where my logic differs from the tutorial?

Help me understand where I've gone wrong or help me port the example over to OpenGL/C++.

void move(){
    sprite.x += x_Vel;
    if(check_collision(sprite,platform1) || check_collision(sprite,platform2))
    { 
        sprite.x -= x_Vel;
    }

    sprite.y += y_Vel;
    if(check_collision(sprite,platform1) || check_collision(sprite,platform2))
    {
        sprite.y -= y_Vel;
    }
}

void drawSprite (RECT rect) { ... }
void mySKeyboard(int key, int x, int y) { ... }
void main (int argc, char** argv){ ... }
share|improve this question
1  
Can you be more specific about the problem or do we have to scan the entire code? – user1944441 Mar 20 '13 at 19:25
    
the main problem I'm having is the movement of the little square and colliding with the rectangles. I confuse myself with the velocity and x/y position. I'm unsure how to stop the sprite moving should a collision be present. – Reanimation Mar 20 '13 at 19:41
1  
GLUT is not OpenGL. It's a 3rd party library that you can use to open and manage an OpenGL window. – Nicol Bolas Mar 20 '13 at 22:55
    
Indeed. You are correct. I'm using Glut for key inputs mainly. – Reanimation Mar 20 '13 at 23:09
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are only updating the display when a key is being pressed.

Instead of that, make an 'idle' function which calls glutPostRedisplay(), and set it with glutIdleFunc(). That will make the rendering continuous.

I'd also suggest using double buffering rather than single.

And note that your move() function updates the global sprite but the rendering function which calls it has sprite passed in by value, so will always render the previous values.

It's up to you how to respond to a collision. You could set the velocity to zero if you just want things to stop. You could negate it if you want things to bounce. Or you could leave it alone if you want things to continue on in the same direction should the sprite move past the obstacle.

So perhaps make the following changes:

void display(void)
{
    glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT);
    drawSprite(sprite);
    drawPlatform(platform1);
    drawPlatform(platform2);
    glutSwapBuffers();
//  glFlush();
}

void mySKeyboard(int key, int x, int y)
{
    switch(key){
    case GLUT_KEY_LEFT:
        x_Vel -= speed;
//      glutPostRedisplay();
        break;
etc...

void update()
{
    glutPostRedisplay();
}

void main (int argc, char** argv)
{
...
    glutInitDisplayMode(GLUT_DOUBLE | GLUT_RGB);    // Set display mode.
    glutIdleFunc(update);
share|improve this answer
    
Oh i see. Can you give me an example of the glutIdleFunc()? I did try setting values to zero but didnt work. I may have implemented it wrong of course. – Reanimation Mar 20 '13 at 20:06
    
My whole implementation must be wrong because those changes make my sprite disappear as soon as I press a direction key... I'm getting the feeling its not as easy to do in OpenGL/c++ as I first thought. – Reanimation Mar 20 '13 at 20:31
1  
You might want to check that the sprite is not flying off the side of the screen... – JasonD Mar 20 '13 at 20:32
    
I think this is actually beyond my capabilities now. I think it is flying off the screen. Im just confused as how implementation with an SDL can differ so much when the logic is the same. Thanks for your help though. I appreciate your time. – Reanimation Mar 20 '13 at 20:41
    
I've just re-wrote my program and your void update etc is very handy. Works great. Now I just need to perfect the collision. Thanks again. – Reanimation Mar 20 '13 at 23:11

In your move function, you have to reset your velocities as well, so as to prevent the motion when a collision takes place:

void move(){
    sprite.x += x_Vel;
    if(check_collision(sprite,platform1) || check_collision(sprite,platform2))
    { 
        sprite.x -= x_Vel;
        x_Vel *= 0.9;//Decrease x_Vel
    }

    sprite.y += y_Vel;
    if(check_collision(sprite,platform1) || check_collision(sprite,platform2))
    {
        sprite.y -= y_Vel;
        y_Vel *= 0.9;//Decrease y_Vel
    }
}

You'll notice that you don't want to set the velocities to 0, just decrement them to avoid floating boxes.

share|improve this answer
    
That makes sense. I wonder why that's not implemented in the tutorial... – Reanimation Mar 20 '13 at 19:51

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