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i was surfing the internet when i came across this algorithm(making change) and implemented it as below...but still is there any efficient way to do this...also how can i find the complexity for the same from program i implemented...

1>algorithm is as follows

makechange(c[],n) //c will contain the coins which we can take as our soln choice and 'n' is the amount we want change for
soln<-NULL//set that will hold solution
sum=0
while(sum!=n)
{
    x<-largest item in c such that sum+x<=n
    if(there is no such item)
    return not found
    soln <- soln U {a coin of value x}
    sum=sum+x
    return soln
}

2>here is what i have tried

#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>

void main() {
    int c[]= {100,50,20,10,5,1},soln[6];
    int num,i,j,sum=0,x,k,flag=0;
    clrscr();
    printf("\nEnter amount to make change:");
    scanf("%d",&num);

    for(i=0;i<6;i++) {
        soln[i]=NULL;
    }

    j=0;
    while(sum!=num) {
        for(i=0;i<6;i++) {
            if(sum+c[i]<=num) {
                x=c[i];
                break;
            }
        }

        sum=sum+x;
        for(k=0;k<6;k++) {
            if(soln[k]==x) {
                flag=1;
            }
        }

        if(flag!=1)
        soln[j]=x;
        j++;
    }

    printf("\nsoln contains coins below:");
    j=0;

    while(soln[j]!=NULL) {
        printf("%d ",soln[j]);
        j++;
    }
    getch();
}

any help would be appreciated...thank you...

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closed as off topic by Bill the Lizard Mar 20 '13 at 20:52

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5  
void main()? Where did you learn this from? –  undefined behaviour Mar 20 '13 at 19:26
    
"for(i=0;i<6;i++) { if(sum+c[i]<=num) { x=c[i]; break; } }" does not correspond to "x<-largest item in c such that sum+x<=n" –  undefined behaviour Mar 20 '13 at 19:30
    
@modifiablelvalue but the program works...i am asking for the optimal way –  Karan Mer Mar 20 '13 at 19:30
    
@KaranMer then it should be migrated to Code Review –  Jan Dvorak Mar 20 '13 at 19:31
    
how can i migrate it to code review... –  Karan Mer Mar 20 '13 at 19:33
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2 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

For fun, here's a constexpr version!

template <int... denomination>
    static constexpr auto change(int amount) -> decltype(make_tuple(denomination...))
    {
        typedef decltype(make_tuple(denomination...)) R;
        return R { [&]() { auto fill=amount/denomination; amount-=denomination*fill; return fill;}()... };
    }

Demo: Live On Coliru

#include <boost/tuple/tuple_io.hpp>
#include <iostream>

using boost::tuple;
using boost::make_tuple;

template <int... denomination>
    static constexpr auto change(int amount) -> decltype(make_tuple(denomination...))
    {
        typedef decltype(make_tuple(denomination...)) R;
        return R { [&]() { auto fill=amount/denomination; amount-=denomination*fill; return fill;}()... };
    }

int main() {
    auto coins = change<100,50,20,10,5,1>(367);
    std::cout << coins;
}

Output:

(3 1 0 1 1 2)

Version without boost: http://liveworkspace.org/code/3uU2AS$0

For absolute awesome, this is the disassembly of the non-boost version compiled by clang with -O2. http://paste.ubuntu.com/5632315/

Notice the pattern 3 1 0 1 1 2?

400826:   be 03 00 00 00          mov    $0x3,%esi
...
400847:   be 01 00 00 00          mov    $0x1,%esi
...
400868:   31 f6                   xor    %esi,%esi
...
400886:   be 01 00 00 00          mov    $0x1,%esi
...
4008a7:   be 01 00 00 00          mov    $0x1,%esi
...
4008c8:   be 02 00 00 00          mov    $0x2,%esi

It was completely compiletime evaluated!

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3  
My brain, it burrrrrrrns... –  Shotgun Ninja Mar 20 '13 at 20:29
    
To be perfectly honest, the original code wasn't much clearer to me :) At least, functionally "fill", "amount", "denomination" tell me what is happening :) –  sehe Mar 20 '13 at 20:34
1  
So, that's an interesting loophole to circumvent current constexpr constraints (no declarations, no multiple statements, etc). –  pepper_chico Jul 18 '13 at 0:29
add comment

The other approach is to go through the coin options, staring with the largest, and taking as many of those as you can without going negative, and then on to the next largest, and so on:

#define RESULT_EXACT   1
#define RESULT_INEXACT 0

int i;
int result_exact = RESULT_EXACT;

for (i=0; i<6; i++) {
    soln[i] = n/c[i]; // How many of this value do we need
    n -= soln[i]*c[i]; // We've now given that amount away
}

if (n!=0) result_exact = RESULT_INEXACT;

Obviously (I hope) this require that c stores the coin values from largest to smallest and requires a check on result_exact to know if the change is exactly correct.

share|improve this answer
    
yes exactly c is storing values from largest to smallest –  Karan Mer Mar 20 '13 at 19:31
    
You may want to try it against something like n = 4 and c = [ 3, 2 ]. If the coin values aren't static, they normally aren't in these exercises, you will need a different approach –  Alexander Mar 20 '13 at 19:52
    
@Alexander fair point, flag indicating inability to do the impossible added. –  Neil Townsend Mar 20 '13 at 19:57
    
@NeilTownsend, there are other cases though, n = 8 and c = [ 7, 2 ] –  Alexander Mar 20 '13 at 20:02
    
@Alexander, you are, of course, correct. The question was about how to implement a particular algorythm most effectively, which I have tried to do with the answer. I have also flagged the question and suggested it should go to codereview, as I suspect that is where a question such as this is best placed. If you wish to engage in a question about the best way to solve this problem, perhaps it would be best to make that a separate question? Obviously I'm much newer on SO than you, so please do correct me if I'm getting something wrong here. –  Neil Townsend Mar 20 '13 at 20:09
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