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I am writing my own drag and drop file manager. This includes a javascript marquee selection box which when active calculates the elements (files) that are intersected and selects them by adding a class to them.

I currently perform the check during a mousemove handler, loop through an array of element coordinates and determine which ones are intersected by the drag and drop selection box.

The function currently looks like this:

selectItems : function(voidindex){

                        var self = this;
                        var coords = self.cache.selectioncoords;

    for(var i=0, len = self.cache.items.length; i<len; i++){
           var item = self.cache.items[i];
           var itemcoords = item.box_pos;

           if(coords.topleft.x < (itemcoords.x+201) && coords.topright.x > itemcoords.x && coords.topleft.y < (itemcoords.y+221) && coords.bottomleft.y > itemcoords.y){
               if(!item.selected){
                  item.selected = true;
                  item.html.addClass('selected').removeClass('activebutton');
                  self.cache.selecteditems.push(i);
                  self.setInfo();
               }
           }
           else{
               if(item.selected){
                  item.selected = false;
                  if(!voidindex || voidindex !== i){
                      item.html.removeClass('selected');
                  }
                  var removeindex = self.cache.selecteditems.indexOf(i);
                  self.cache.selecteditems.splice(removeindex, 1);
                  self.setInfo();
           }
       }
  }
},

There is lots of dirty logic in the code above which ensures that the DOM is only manipulated when the selection changes. This is not relevant to the question and can be exluded. The important part is the intersection logic which checks the coordinates of the element versus the coordinates of the marquee selection box.

Also please note that the item dimensions are fixed at 201px width by 221px height.

I have tested this and all works perfectly, however I have the need to support potentially thousands of files which would mean that at some point we will start seeing UI performance decrease.

I would like to know if there is anyway to perform intersection detection without looping through the coordinates of each element.

The coordinates of the marquee box are defined as follows at any given time:

 selectioncoords : {
                    topleft : {
                        x : 0,
                        y : 0
                    },
                    topright : {
                        x : 0,
                        y : 0
                    },
                    bottomleft : {
                        x : 0,
                        y : 0
                    },
                    bottomright : {
                        x : 0,
                        y : 0
                    },
                    width : 0,
                    height : 0
                }

And the coordinates of each item, stored in the self.cache.items array are defined as follows:

item : {
       box_pos : {
             x : 0,
             y : 0
       },
       grid_pos : {
              row : 1,
              column : 1
       }


    }

So the information available will always be the actual grid position (row/column) as well as the physical item position (left and top offsets in pixels within the grid).

So to summarize, the question is, is there anyway to detect item intersection from a set of marquee selection box coordinates as defined above without looping through the whole array of item coordinates every time the mousemove event fires?

Thanks in advance for any help.

share|improve this question
    
I don't have time for a full-fledged answer, but consider this. Intersection between rectangles happens when one of the corners of the item are inside the target. You can reduce the loop to 4 checks. – Madara Uchiha Mar 27 '13 at 20:33
    
@MadaraUchiha Thanks. I understand what you are saying. But can't seem to get my head around how I would check for multiple items. Currently I loop through every single item seeing if one of their corner coordinates fall within the selection rectangle. I was wondering if there was some sort of equation I could use which would take the selection coordinates and calculate which rows/columns would be intersected, without the need to ever loop at all. – gordyr Mar 27 '13 at 20:38
    
That's a question for Mathematics. You may want to give them a visit. – Madara Uchiha Mar 27 '13 at 20:45
    
@MadaraUchiha A good suggestion. Thank you. – gordyr Mar 27 '13 at 20:46
up vote 2 down vote accepted
+200

There are several ways you could approach this. Here's one. First you need the items in some kind of organized structure that you can look up quickly by row and column. You could use a two-dimensional array, or for simplicity I'm going to use a hash table. You could do this at the same time that you create the self.cache.items, or later, something like this:

var cacheLookup = {};

function initCacheLookup() {
    var items = self.cache.items;
    for( var i = 0, n = items.length;  i < n;  i++ ) {
        var item = items[i];
        var key = [ item.grid_pos.row, item.grid_pos.column ].join(',');
        cacheLookup[key] = item;
    }
}

Then when you want to get the items intersecting the rectangle, you could do something like this:

var itemWidth = 201, itemHeight = 221;

var tl = selectioncoords.topleft, br = selectioncoords.bottomright;
var left = Math.floor( tl.x / itemWidth ) + 1;
var right = Math.floor( br.x / itemWidth ) + 1;
var top = Math.floor( tl.y / itemHeight ) + 1;
var bottom = Math.floor( br.y / itemHeight ) + 1;

var selecteditems = [];
for( var row = top;  row <= bottom;  row++ ) {
    for( var col = left;  col <= right;  col++ ) {
        var key = [ row, col ].join(',');
        var item = cacheLookup[key];
        if( item ) {
            selecteditems.push( item );
        }
    }
}
// Now selecteditems has the items intersecting the rectangle

There's probably an off-by-one error or two here, but this should be close.

Well, as I said, that is one way to do it. And it has the possibly interesting property that it doesn't depend on the order of items in the self.cache.items array. But that cacheLookup hash table smells like it might not be the most efficient solution.

Let me take a guess: isn't that array already in the correct order by rows and columns (or vice versa)? For example, if your grid is four wide, then the top row would be array elements 0-3, the second row 4-7, the third row 8-11, etc. Or it could be a similar arrangement going down the columns.

Assuming it's in row-by-row order, then you don't need the hash table at all. That initCacheLookup() function goes away, and instead the search code looks like this:

var nCols = 4/*whatever*/;  // defined somewhere else
var itemWidth = 201, itemHeight = 221;

var tl = selectioncoords.topleft, br = selectioncoords.bottomright;
var left = Math.floor( tl.x / itemWidth );
var right = Math.floor( br.x / itemWidth );
var top = Math.floor( tl.y / itemHeight ) * nCols;
var bottom = Math.floor( br.y / itemHeight ) * nCols;

var items = self.cache.items;
var selecteditems = [];
for( var iRow = top;  iRow <= bottom;  iRow += nCols ) {
    for( var col = left;  col <= right;  col++ ) {
        var index = iRow + col;
        if( index < items.length ) {
            selecteditems.push( items[index] );
        }
    }
}
// Now selecteditems has the items intersecting the rectangle

This code will be a little faster, and it's simpler too. Also it doesn't depend at all on the item.box_pos and item.grid_pos. You may not need those data fields at all, because they are easily calculated from the item index, grid column count, and item height and width.

Some related notes:

Don't hard code 201 and 221 in the code. Store those in variables once, only, and then use those variables when you need the item height and width.

There is a lot of duplication in your data structures. I recommend that you ruthlessly eliminate all duplicated data unless there is a specific need for it. Specifically:

selectioncoords: {
    topleft: {
        x: 0,
        y: 0
    },
    topright: {
        x: 0,
        y: 0
    },
    bottomleft: {
        x: 0,
        y: 0
    },
    bottomright: {
        x: 0,
        y: 0
    },
    width: 0,
    height: 0
}

More than half the data here is duplicated or can be calculated. This is all you need:

selectioncoords: {
    left: 0,
    right: 0,
    top: 0,
    bottom: 0
}

The reason I bring this up is that was a bit confusing when working on the code: "I want the left edge. Do I get that from topleft.x or bottomleft.x? Are they really the same like they seem? How do I pick?"

Also, as mentioned above, the item.box_pos and item.grid_pos may not be needed at all if the items are stored in a sequential array. If they are needed, you could store just one and calculate the other from it, since there's a direct relationship between the two:

box_pos.x === ( grid_pos.column - 1 ) * itemWidth
box_pos.y === ( grid_pos.row - 1 ) * itemHeight
share|improve this answer
2  
This works perfectly... A very elegant answer thank you. I'm going to spend the next hour testing the great solutions presented here before awarding the answer. Extra props to you for giving a complete code sample using my variables. Great job. cheers. – gordyr Mar 27 '13 at 21:18
    
indeed, you're correct about the duplicate data. While working on something like where I am not sure what I am going to need I tend to store everything possible while initially creating the arrays. Then when I've worked out which approach to take, I strip back to what is actually required. Thanks for the point anyway. It's just the way I have always worked :) – gordyr Mar 27 '13 at 21:26
2  
I've awarded, for your attention to detail and elegant code example. I really couldn't have wished for more. I will award the bounty in 23 hours when I am able. Thank you :) – gordyr Mar 27 '13 at 21:29
    
Well, thank you! I added another approach to the code that will be faster and simpler if the self.cache.items array happens to be in order by row and column. Also a bit of explanation about why I made the suggestion about reducing data duplication. But certainly feel free to take any suggestions with a grain of salt. :-) – Michael Geary Mar 27 '13 at 22:31
1  
I've just tested your latest function with 250,000 items. I am using self rolled infinite scrolling to detach and reattach cells to and from the DOM as they move into view all the while constantly updating their properties with various event data and much more... And it's perfect. The UI is as fast with 250,000 items as it is with 10 when selecting. With regards to the order, it is fine, as when selected items are dragged in order to rearrange them we splice the self.cache.items array to match the new positions on mouseup. You sir... are a star :-) – gordyr Mar 27 '13 at 23:22

The following depends upon a locked grid with the dimensions as described.

You are comparing a mouse-defined rectangle against a grid with static edge sizes. Thus, given an x coordinate or a y coordinate, you should be able to derive pretty easily which column or row (respectively) the coordinate falls into.

When the user starts the select box, grab that x and y, and find the row/column of the start. When the mouse moves while pulling the select box, you find (and then update) the row/column of the finish. anything that is both within the rows defined by that box and within the columns defined by that box (inclusive) is selected. If you then keep your selectable elements in a two-dimensional array according to rows and columns, you should be able to just grab the ones you want that way.

Mind, how much more (or less) efficient this is depends on the size of your expected selection boxes as compared to the total size, and the degree to which you expect the grid to be populated. Certainly, if the average use case is selecting half or so of the objects at a time, there's not a whole lot you can do to cut down efficiently on the number of objects you have to look at each time.

Also, though it is kludgy, you can have the mousemove handler not fire every time. Letting it pause a bit between updates will reduce the responsiveness of this particular function a fair bit, but it'll cut down significantly on the amount of resources that are used.

share|improve this answer
    
Fab, thats very helpful thank you. I am already throttling events, but thanks for bringing it up. I was just about to award you the answer since I was certain I could work something out from the comments you made but @svidgen has just posted a fantastic answer with an excellent code example. I hope thats okay. Cheers! – gordyr Mar 27 '13 at 21:14
    
Well, I suppose that getting flooded with high-quality answers is supposed to be a natural result of putting up 200 point bounties. I'm glad I could be helpful. – Ben Barden Mar 27 '13 at 21:18
    
+1 for a spatial-index-like solution. The question might be suited for math, but it is more precisely a computer graphics problem - when drawing a 2D plane (on the screen) which is a projection of 3D space you need to detect the collision of 3D objects, or in 2D space, an intersection. That's efficiently done with trees. I googled upon this and Ben's solution is something like this. There are some simpler variants but I can't find them now ofc. Hope it'll get you inspired :) – linski Mar 27 '13 at 21:33

You can limit the scope of your checks by indexing each item in a grid, as often as necessary and no more often. You can use the grid to give you a list of elements near an X, Y coordinate or that might be in an X1, Y2, X1, Y2 range.

To get you started ...

var Grid = function(pixelWidth, pixelHeight, boxSize) {

  this.cellsIn = function(x1, y1, x2, y2) {
    var rv = [];
    for (var x = x1; x < x2; x += boxSize) {
      for (var y = y1; y < y2; y += boxSize) {
        var gx = Math.ceil(x/boxSize);
        var gy = Math.ceil(y/boxSize);
        rv.push(this.cells[gx][gy]);
      }
    }
    return rv;
  } // cellsIn()


  this.add = function(x1, y1, x2, y2, o) {
    var cells = this.cellsIn(x1, y1, x2, y2);
    for (var i in cells) {
      cells[i].push(o);
    }
  } // add()


  this.get = function(x1, y1, x2, y2) {
    var rv = [];
    var rv_index = {};
    var cells = this.cellsIn(x1, y1, x2, y2);
    for (var i in cells) {
      var cell = cells[i];
      for (var oi in cell) {
        if (!rv_index[cell[oi]]) {
          rv_index[cell[oi]] = 1;
          rv.push(cell[oi]);
        }
      }
    }
    return rv;
  } // get()


  this.cells = [];
  for (var x = 0; x < Math.ceil(pixelWidth/boxSize); x++) {
    this.cells[x] = [];
    for (var y = 0; y < Math.ceil(pixelHeight/boxSize); y++) {
      this.cells[x][y] = [];
    }
  }

};

So, rather than iterating through all possible objects, whatever they may be, you iterate over all the objects that are near or potentially in the given coordinates.

This requires that you maintain/re-index the grid as item coordinates change. And you'll likely want to add some functionality to the above (or similar) Grid class to modify/move existing objects. But, to the best of my knowledge, an index of this sort is the best, if not only, way to index objects "in space."

Disclaimer: The code above isn't tested. But, I have similar code that is. See the DemoGrid function class here: http://www.thepointless.com/js/ascii_monsters.js

The functionality of my DemoGrid is similar (as far as I remember, it's been awhile), but accepts x, y, radius as parameters instead. Also notable, my mouse events don't touch the grid every time the event fires. Checks are rate-limited by a game/main loop.

share|improve this answer
    
Fantastic. Exactly what I was looking for. Between your excellent answer and ?Ben Barden's great points I'm sure I can now solve this in a far more efficient manner. Many thanks! – gordyr Mar 27 '13 at 21:15

If the system is set up such that

  • self.cache.items is ordered from left to right and top to bottom
    • (0,0),(1,0),(2,0),(0,1),(1,1),(1,2),(0,2),(1,2),(2,2)
  • There is an item in each space
    • GOOD - (0,0),(1,0),(2,0),(0,1),(1,1),(1,2),(0,2),(1,2),(2,2)
    • BAD - (0,0),(2,0)(1,2),(1,3),(2,1),(2,3)
  • We need to know the total number of columns.

So the code to get you started.

// Some 'constants' we'll need.
number_of_columns = 4;
item_width = 201;
item_height = 221;

// First off, we are dealing with a grid system, 
// so that means that if given the starting x and y of the marquee,
// we can determine which element in the cache to start where we begin.
top_left_selected_index = Math.floor(selectioncoords.topleft.x / item_width) + (Math.floor(selectioncoords.topright.y / item_height) * number_of_columns );

// Now, because the array is in order, and there are no empty cache points, 
// we know that the lower bound of the selected items is `top_left_selected_index`
// so all we have to do is walk the array to grab the other selected.

number_columns_selected = (selectioncoords.bottomright.x - selectioncoords.topleft.x) / item_width;
// if it it doesn't divide exactly it means there is an extra column selected
if((selectioncoords.bottomright.x - selectioncoords.topleft.x) % item_width > 0){
  number_columns_selected += 1;
}

// if it it doesn't divide exactly it means there is an extra column selected
number_rows_selected = (selectioncoords.bottomright.y - selectioncoords.topleft.y) / item_height;
if((selectioncoords.bottomright.y - selectioncoords.topleft.y) % item_height > 0){
  number_rows_selected += 1;
}

// Outer loop handles the moving the pointer in terms of the row, so it
// increments by the number of columns.
// EX: Given my simple example array, To get from (1,0) to (1,1) 
// requires an index increase of 3
for(i=0; i < number_rows_selected; i++){
  // Inner loop marches through the the columns, so it is just one at a time.
  // Added j < number_of_columns in case your marquee stretches well past your content
  for(j=0; j < number_columns_selected && j < number_of_columns; j++){
    // Do stuff to the selected items.
    self.cache.items[top_left_selected_index + (i * number_of_columns) + j];
  }
}
share|improve this answer

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