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I want to have multiple environments in Ruby that can execute arbitrary code. This code might define a new class, and I only want this new class to be available in the environment that defined it.

For example, I want to do something like this:

class Environment
  def evaluate(&code)
    # Evaluate the code in this environment.
  end
end

e1 = Environment.new
e2 = Environment.new

e1.evaluate do
  class InnerClass
    # ...
  end

  puts InnerClass.nil? # false
end

e2.evaluate do
  puts InnerClass.nil? # true
end

I've tried using instance_eval and evaluating inside a Binding, but neither of these will hide the classes from the other environments. Is there a nice way to do this?

share|improve this question

You can use instance_eval and dynamic class definition like that:

e1.instance_eval do
  innerClass = Class.new do
    # ...
  end
  puts innerClass.nil? # false
end

e2.instance_eval do
   innerClass.nil? # NameError, innerClass not defined
end
share|improve this answer
    
Very cool. I didn't know you could do this! However, it's still not perfect. If you try to assign a new class to an uppercase name (like "InnerClass"), then it becomes a global constant. – Tim Mahoney Mar 21 '13 at 0:07
    
Yes, if you assign a class to a constant, then you assign it to a constant. If you don't want your class being assigned to a constant don't assign it to a constant. – Jörg W Mittag Mar 21 '13 at 0:46
    
@JörgWMittag haha yes I understand this. The problem is that I want it to be a local constant, not a global constant. It seems like that doesn't exist in Ruby. – Tim Mahoney Mar 21 '13 at 1:52
up vote 0 down vote accepted

As it turns out, instance_eval will work. However, in order to wrap the classes within the instance, you need to provide a string instead of a block. Check it out.

e1.instance_eval <<EOF
  class InnerClass
  end
  puts InnerClass.nil? # false
EOF

e2.instance_eval <<EOF
   InnerClass.nil? # NameError
EOF

The implementation that takes the string wraps everything in an anonymous class, but the one that takes a block does not.

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