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I'm not a SQL Server 2008 expert, but this is what I'm trying to accomplish. Let's say that I have this table:

I want to count the records that don't have values in col2, col3, and col4 where col1=1, I have tried this:

SELECT COUNT(col1) 
FROM table 
WHERE 
    LEN(col2) > 1 OR LEN(col3) > 1 OR LEN(col4) > 1 AND col1 = '1'

But I get thousands of records. If any of you guys can help or point me in the right direction I'll appreciate it.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
What does "empty" mean? NULL? Empty string? Something else? – Aaron Bertrand Mar 20 '13 at 20:14
2  
And has higher precedence than or. Your WHERE is equivalent to LEN(col2) > 1 OR LEN(col3) > 1 OR (LEN(col4) > 1 AND col1 = '1') – Martin Smith Mar 20 '13 at 20:15
    
I apologize, but you are right NULL, EMPTY menas different things, lets say that there are no characters on the column. – RicEspn Mar 20 '13 at 20:17
    
In the first place, if you want records with no values, you want LEN(col1)=0 not >1. Also, as Aaron says, you need to specify what 'empty' means. If the column is NULL, I wouldn't use LEN. LEN of a NULL field returns NULL, not 0. – Melanie Mar 20 '13 at 20:17
    
So if there are no characters in the column, it can be NULL or an empty string. These are different things. Can it be both, or just one? – Melanie Mar 20 '13 at 20:18
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Check the operator precedence at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms190276.aspx

'AND' gets evaluated before 'OR' so your example looks like:

SELECT COUNT(col1) 
FROM table 
WHERE 
    LEN(col2) > 1 OR LEN(col3) > 1 OR ( LEN(col4) > 1 AND col1 = '1' )

That is a pretty open selection. You said:

I want to count the records that don't have values

But your code is counting the records that DO have values. So maybe you want this:

SELECT COUNT(col1)
FROM table
WHERE col1 = '1' AND
(  col2 IS NULL
OR col3 IS NULL
OR col4 IS NULL
)

You can show data that has values when you say:

WHERE LEN(col2) > 0

But if col2 IS NULL, then LEN(col2) IS NULL as well. Not zero.

If your string is '' instead of NULL, then you could check the LENgth:

SELECT COUNT(col1)
FROM table
WHERE col1 = '1' AND
(  LEN(col2) = 0
OR LEN(col3) = 0
OR LEN(col4) = 0
)

And of course, if you really did intend to see values that were not empty:

SELECT COUNT(col1)
FROM table
WHERE col1 = '1' AND
(  LEN(col2) > 0
OR LEN(col3) > 0
OR LEN(col4) > 0
)

Also in your example, you said the LEN() was > 1. Did you mean greater than 1 or zero?

share|improve this answer
    
Kenvro, that worked!, I was breaking my head on how to do this, thanks. also thanks to everyone that posted an answer, next time I'll try to be more specific on my questions. – RicEspn Mar 20 '13 at 20:52
    
It's probably not a problem in this case, but it's good to be aware that LEN doesn't count trailing spaces. So, LEN(' ') = 0. This would only be a problem for you if you didn't want to consider a column with only spaces to be "empty". – GilM Mar 20 '13 at 22:42

Just add more WHERE conditions

SELECT COUNT(col1) 
FROM   table 
WHERE  col2 IS NULL
  AND  col3 IS NULL 
  AND  col4 IS NULL 
  AND  col1='1'

Also your example language contradicts our sample code. You may want instead:

SELECT COUNT(col1) 
FROM   table 
WHERE  
  (    col2 IS NULL
  OR   col3 IS NULL 
  OR   col4 IS NULL 
  )
  AND  col1='1'
share|improve this answer
    
Lighthart, Thanks for your answer, I have tried that and if I use IS NULL dont work because is an empty string value. Thanks for helping. – RicEspn Mar 20 '13 at 20:41
    
See GilM's answer. – Lighthart Mar 20 '13 at 20:53

Maybe you want:

SELECT COUNT(col1) 
FROM   table 
WHERE  
  (    COALESCE(col2,'')=''
  OR   COALESCE(col3,'')=''
  OR   COALESCE(col4,'')=''
  )
  AND  col1='1'
share|improve this answer

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