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In the example below, where I tried to reduce the problem to its minimal, there are 4 classes A,B,C,D., which form an inheritance hierarchy

When the program starts, an object d from class D is created and the test method of the D class is called. This method in turns calls the caller method of the C class. This method tries to use member function pointer to call the correct f method. In this case it should call the f method associated to class D but it calls the one associated to class B.

How come ?

class A {
    public:
    virtual void f() = 0;
};

class B : public A{
    public:
    virtual void f() { cout << "IN B" << endl;}   
};

class C : public B{
    public:
    virtual void f() { B::f(); cout << "IN C" << endl; }
    virtual void caller(){
        void (A::*cb)() = NULL;
        cb = &A::f;
        (this->*cb)();
    }
};

class D : public C{
    public:
    virtual void f() { C::f(); cout << "IN D" << endl; }
    void test(){
         caller();
    }
};

int main(){
    D d;
    d.test(); // Why does this prints only "IN B" 
    return 0;
}

UPDATE : The code actually works, the problem had nothing to due with the presented code and seemed to come from a version mismatch between the library providing class A,B,C and the one providing class D.

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by 0x499602D2, Mat, DarkAjax, Mario Sannum, Mike Mar 21 '13 at 0:25

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
+1: Short, well-worded question with well-indented code. – Angew Mar 20 '13 at 20:44
1  
I'm unable to reproduce with g++, even after fixing the accessibility of things so that the code compiles. Which compiler and version? – Cheers and hth. - Alf Mar 20 '13 at 20:50
    
Pretty much all compilers here are giving the output you expect. Maybe you are not really showing the real code you're testing? In fact, the code from the question required some change in order to make it compile – Andy Prowl Mar 20 '13 at 20:53
    
If you're using prints to debug your code, make sure to use setvbuf to remove line buffering so that whatever you are printing gets printed immediately instead of when stdout gets filled and the buffer gets flushed cplusplus.com/reference/cstdio/setvbuf – Radu Chivu Mar 20 '13 at 21:02

You sure it prints only "IN B"? I compile it on MSVC2012, I got

IN B
IN C
IN D

What's more, your original code does not compile on VS2012, at least not before I add public: to every class. e.g.:

class C : public B{
public:  // <--- here
    virtual void f() { B::f(); cout << "IN C" << endl; }
    virtual void caller(){
        void (A::*cb)() = NULL;
        cb = &A::f;
        (this->*cb)();
    }
};
share|improve this answer

It prints

IN B
IN C
IN D

So, the problem is somewhere else.

share|improve this answer
    
-1 nope .......... – Cheers and hth. - Alf Mar 20 '13 at 20:44
    
@Cheersandhth.-Alf: You were right, I edited my answer. however, the question is wrong at least in gcc. – deepmax Mar 20 '13 at 20:52
    
Yes then its sure the problem is somewhere else! Thank you – efx Mar 20 '13 at 20:57

it works. add public: declaration. also warning about different behavior of overloading and virtualisation. best approach is to use pointer or reference.

class A {
public:
    virtual void f() = 0;
};

class B : public A{
    public:
    virtual void f() { std::cout << "IN B" << std::endl;}   
};

class C : public B{
    public:
    virtual void f() { B::f(); std::cout << "IN C" << std::endl; }
    virtual void caller(){
        void (A::*cb)() = NULL;
        cb = &A::f;
        (this->*cb)();
    }
};

class D : public C{
    public:
    virtual void f() { C::f(); std::cout << "IN D" << std::endl; }
    void test(){
         caller();
    }
};

output:

IN B
IN C
IN D

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