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I'm working on a fitness game web app. The idea is that each week has a certain number of tasks that a person must complete before the next week is revealed. Here is my models.py schema for the app so far:

from django.db import models from django.contrib.auth.models import User

class WeekOne(models.Model):
    squats = models.PositiveIntegerField()
    lunges = models.PositiveIntegerField()
    skipStairs = models.BooleanField()
    stairDaysCount = models.PositiveSmallIntegerField()
    # Set to true if (squats == 1000), (lunges == 250), 
    # (skipStairs is True), and (stairDaysCount == 3)
    weekOneComplete = models.BooleanField()

class UserProfile(models.Model):
    user = models.OneToOneField(User)
    weekOne = models.ForeignKey(WeekOne)

I'm lost on a few points. First of all, obviously I want each user to be able to track their own progress and not have any other users be able to see it. Is making weekOne a ForeignKey the best way to do this? If so, how does accessing each user's data work once this relationship is defined? For example, if I wanted to create an addSquats function, would I do something like this:

user = UserProfile()
user.squats += 5

or would I have to do some other magic to get to the squats field?

Second, every time a user makes a change to their progress (i.e., adds a squat or lunge), I want to check if all of the fields have met a certain a benchmark. If they have, I want to set weekOneComplete to true. Each addition will be triggered by some javascript when a user clicks a button -- but where would I put the function that checks/updates the database?

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2  
The question title seems at odds with the questions themselves :) –  isedev Mar 20 '13 at 20:48
    
Hahah, holdover from a question I never asked. ;-) –  user1427661 Mar 20 '13 at 20:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First of all, obviously I want each user to be able to track their own progress and not have any other users be able to see it.

In the template, you can do like this

 User: {{ user.username }}
 squats: {{ user.userprofile.squats }} 
 lunges: {{ user.userprofile.lunges }}
 Skip Stairs: 
    {% if user.userprofile.skipStairs %}
       Yes
    {% else %}
       No
    {% endif %}
 Stair: {{ user.userprofile.stairDaysCount }}}
 Week Completed: 
    {% if user.userprofile.weekOneComplete %}
        Yes
    {% else %}
        In-Progress
    {% endif %}

How does accessing each user's data work once this relationship is defined? For example, if I wanted to create an addSquats function.

To access user data,

user = UserProfile(user=request.user)
user.weekOne.squats += 5
user.weekOne.save()
user.save()

Second, every time a user makes a change to their progress (i.e., adds a squat or lunge), I want to check if all of the fields have met a certain a benchmark. If they have, I want to set weekOneComplete to true.

Under your UserProfile model, create check updates function.

class UserProfile(models.Model):
    user = models.OneToOneField(User)
    weekOne = models.ForeignKey(WeekOne)

    def check_updates(self):
        check = WeekOne.object.get(id=self.weekOne)

        if check.skipStairs and \
           check.squats == 1000 and \
           check.lunges == 250 and \
           check.stairDaysCount == 3:

           check.weekOneComplete = True
           check.save()

So every time you update the data for that user, just call the method like this:

user = UserProfile.objects.get(user=request.user)
user.check_updates()
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To access field of week one you need to do:

user.weekOne.squats += 5
user.weekOne.save()

Actually, it is better to use the F function and do (or similar):

user.weekOne.squats = F('squates') + 5

In general, it is better to do all checkings also in the server side and not to rely on the client (JS or whatever). E.g You expose a url and check for all the POST params that they are integers (e.g. converted to ints)

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To your second question: one possible (and simple) way of doing this, since you say you're using javascript, is through an ajax call.

It should point to a url which, itself, points to a view that'll handle the data you're sending in the request. Something along the lines of (say you're using a POST request):

def add(request):
    if not request.is_ajax():
        raise ...
    excercise, amount = request.POST['excercise'], request.POST['amount']
    user = request.user

    # a model method that'll add to whatever activity 
    # the user did and update the "week one complete" field
    user.did_activity(excercise, amount) 
    if user.weekOne.weekOneComplete:
        return HttpResponse(json.dumps(some_return_data), mimetype="application/json")
    return HttpResponse(json.dumps(other_return_data), mimetype="application/json")

This is more to the side of pseudocode, so you get the idea. You'd still need to write the ajax call on the JS side, the model method that'll add to the correct excercise and validate the benchmark, and save the user to the database. For example:

def did_activity(self, excercise, amount):
    if excercise == 'squats':
        self.weekOne.squats += amount
    ...
    if self.hit_benchmark():
        self.weekOne.weekOneComplete = True
    self.save()

Also, this example assumes the user is authenticated.

Good luck.

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