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I may be approaching this in the wrong way. I wish to use dependency injection on a class of classes so that at runtime based on a setting I can resolve the correct to the correct class. I created an interface with the base properties and methods that will be used in all of the classes. Some of the classes have other properties on them to extend the base implementation. Is there a way other than reflection or methods to get and set additional properties to expose/interact with the extended properties on the client end?

If this is not an appropriate use would I be better of not using DI and stick with hard instantiation of those classes on the client?

Thanks for any advise on this.

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How do you want to expose/interact with these extended properties? The question as it stands is a bit too abstract for a concrete discussion or answer to be given. –  Oded Mar 20 '13 at 20:58
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1 Answer 1

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I created an interface with the base properties and methods that will be used in all of the classes.

I assume that the classes means the implementation classes.

Some of the classes have other properties on them to extend the base implementation.

It's essential for further discussions that you understand whether those other properties are really needed from the perspective of the clients of those classes or if they are actually just private implementation details.

  • Assuming they are private implementation details, then you shouldn't make them publicly visible and you can happily continue accessing the objects as interface instances.

  • If the clients need to use the other properties, then you're violating LSP (the Liskov Substitution Principle, one of the SOLID principles) if you're acessing those via reflection on the interface instance. Note that these principles aren't rules, but following them will help you a lot. Violating LSP tells me that you don't really want to abstract the objects as you have done, behind that single interface. While it's perfectly legal in this case to use casting or the as or is operators to see the actual type, it'll neither leave a nice taste in your mouth, nor a good stomach feeling afterwards.

Is there a way other than reflection or methods to get and set additional properties to expose/interact with the extended properties on the client end?

This is one way:

First, today this is what you have in the "simple" case of no extra properties:

interface ICar
{
    void Accelerate();
}

class CompactCar : ICar
{
    public void Accelerate()
    {
        // Slooooow acceleration
    }
}

class NasCar : ICar
{
    public void Accelerate()
    {
        // Yiehaa!
    }
}

sealed class TrafficSimulator
{
    private readonly List<ICar> _cars = new List<ICar>();

    public void AddCar(ICar car)
    {
        _cars.Add(car);
        car.Accelerate();
    }
}

Then you find yourself adding some properties for certain concrete types and some other for other types:

class CompactCar : ICar
{
    // Can only be used *before* the car is accelerated
    public bool CanOnlyTurn { get; set; } 
    ...
}

class NasCar : ICar
{
    // Can only be used *after* the car is accelerated
    public string NumberPlate { get; set; }
    ...
}

sealed class TrafficSimulator
{
    ...
    public void AddCar(ICar car)
    {
        _cars.Add(car);

        // Check if there's something to do before accelerating
        CompactCar compact = car as CompactCar;

        if (compact != null)
        {
            compact.CanOnlyTurn = true;
        }

        car.Accelerate();

        // Check if there's something to do after accelerating
        NasCar nascar = car as NasCar;

        if (nascar != null)
        {
            nascar.NumberPlate = "I rule!";
        }
    }
}

Now, the above will become a real mess when you keep on doing that. That's what violating LSP will bring you. There's always a reason to add those extra properties. In the case above it's to sometimes do one "special" thing before the acceleration and another "special" thing after.

This specific case can be sortof solved by this:

interface ICarSetup
{
    void BeforeAccelerate();
}

interface ICarTeardown
{
    void AfterAccelerate();
}

class ActionSetup : ICarSetup
{
    private readonly Action _action;

    public ActionSetup(Action action)
    {
        _action = action;
    }

    public void BeforeAccelerate()
    {
        _action();
    }
}

class NullSetup : ICarSetup
{
    public void BeforeAccelerate()
    {
    }
}

class ActionTeardown : ICarTeardown
{
    private readonly Action _action;

    public ActionTeardown(Action action)
    {
        _action = action;
    }

    public void AfterAccelerate()
    {
        _action();
    }
}

class NullTeardown : ICarTeardown
{
    public void AfterAccelerate()
    {
    }
}

sealed class TrafficSimulatorDriver
{
    private TrafficSimulator _trafficSimulator;

    public void RunTheSimulation()
    {
        var nascar = new NasCar();
        var nascarSetup = new NullSetup();
        var nascarTeardown = new ActionTeardown(() => nascar.NumberPlate = "I rule!");
        _trafficSimulator.AddCar(nascar, nascarSetup, nascarTeardown);

        var compact = new CompactCar();
        var compactSetup = new ActionSetup(() => compact.CanOnlyTurn = true);
        var compactTeardown = new NullTeardown();
        _trafficSimulator.AddCar(compact, compactSetup, compactTeardown);
    }
}

sealed class TrafficSimulator
{
    ...
    public void AddCar(ICar car, ICarSetup setup, ICarTeardown teardown)
    {
        _cars.Add(car);
        setup.BeforeAccelerate();
        car.Accelerate();
        teardown.AfterAccelerate();
    }
}

If this is not an appropriate use would I be better of not using DI and stick with hard instantiation of those classes on the client?

Don't mix up those two issues; DI and hard instantiation aren't mutually exclusive. Just because you don't inject a dependency in the form of an interface instance doesn't mean you can't inject a concrete instance.

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Thanks for your input. I was thinking it was just messy to work with them that way. What I am trying to do is provide some flexibility in the program to provide the client with different options for a type. DI with an interface does not seem to be the correct option. I am thinking the best option is find a way to hide class properties depending on the option needed. –  RKaufman Mar 21 '13 at 2:25
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