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I have a string

8,7,13,14,16

Whats the easiest way to determine if a given number is present in that string?

$numberA = "13";
$string = "8,7,13,14,16";

if($string magic $numberA){
$result = "Yeah, that number is in there";
} else {
$result = "Sorry.";
}

Looking for magic.

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5 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted
<?php 
in_array('13', explode(',', '8,7,13,14,16'));
?>

…will return whether '13' is in the string.

Just to elaborate: explode turns the string into an array, splitting it at each ',' in this case. Then, in_array checks if the string '13' is in the resulting array somewhere.

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Just to elaborate: explode turns the string into an array, splitting it at each ',' in this case. Then, in_array checks if the string '13' is in the resulting array somewhere. –  gnud Oct 12 '09 at 9:05
    
this works too well aparently, returns true if the subject is 13, and the target contains a 1 or a 3, not just the whole subject itself. –  GrapeCamel Oct 12 '09 at 9:18
3  
No, patrick, it won't. exploding the sample string like in this answer, generates the array array('8','7','13','14','16'). –  gnud Oct 12 '09 at 9:19
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Another way, that might be more efficient for laaaaaaaarge strings, is using a regexp:

$numberA = "13";
$string = "8,7,13,14,16";

if(preg_match('/(^|,)'.$numberA.'($|,)/', $string)){
    $result = "Yeah, that number is in there";
} else {
    $result = "Sorry.";
}
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That will also match 1,2,113. –  Gumbo Oct 12 '09 at 9:13
    
Yes, I forgot the starting conditional. Now it works. –  gnud Oct 12 '09 at 9:15
    
vava's way is probably a bit faster. If you're familiar with regexes, mine might be more self-explanatory, since it describes what we accept, instead of changing the input. –  gnud Oct 12 '09 at 9:21
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if (strpos(','.$string.',' , ','.$numberA.',') !== FALSE) {
    //found
}

Notice guard ',' chars, they will help to deal with '13' magic '1, 2, 133' case.

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1  
But what about at the end, where it doesn't have a comma behind the number? –  random Oct 12 '09 at 9:09
    
That's why I also added comma to the haystack string :) –  vava Oct 12 '09 at 9:13
    
Nice. Somehow it never occured to me to concat a comma to the original string. I used a regex instead :F –  gnud Oct 12 '09 at 9:13
    
As you said yourself: “13 is a part of 113” and 13, is part of 113,. –  Gumbo Oct 12 '09 at 9:14
1  
Like my first submission, this will fail if the last number is 113. Concat a comma at the start of each string to fix =) –  gnud Oct 12 '09 at 9:16
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Make sure you match the full number in the string, not just part of it.

function numberInList($num, $list) {
    return preg_match("/\b$num\b/", $list);
}
$string = "8,7,13,14,16";    
numberInList(13, $string); # returns 1
numberInList(8, $string); # returns 1
numberInList(1, $string); # returns 0
numberInList(3, $string); # returns 0
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A simple string search should do if you are just checking to find existence of the string. I dont speak php but i think this is how it could be done.

$mystring = '8,7,13,14,16';
$findme   = '13';

if (preg_match('/(?>(^|[^0-9])'.$findme.'([^0-9]|$))/', $mystring)) {
    $result = "Yeah, that number is in there";
} else {
    $result = "Sorry.";
}
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2  
simple search is not enough. 13 is a part of 113 :) –  vava Oct 12 '09 at 9:07
1  
See vava's answer for the proper way =) –  gnud Oct 12 '09 at 9:12
    
Oh yeah i dint think of that. Hmm Then i guess the explode technique answer or maybe using regex would be a faster way –  Jass Oct 12 '09 at 9:13
    
Thanks! +1 for spotting my sillyness –  Jass Oct 12 '09 at 9:14
    
@Jass, both probably slower, but explode looks better and more maintainable. Regexp is generally slow and explode will create and iterate over array. Also, guards can be pre-added, making it even faster :) –  vava Oct 12 '09 at 9:17
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