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I am attempting to follow this answer here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/5087695/343381

I have a need to execute multiple bash commands within a single environment. My test case is simple:

import subprocess
cmd = subprocess.Popen(['bash'], stdin=subprocess.PIPE, stdout=subprocess.PIPE)

# Write the first command
command = "export greeting=hello\n"
cmd.stdin.write(command)
cmd.stdin.flush() # Must include this to ensure data is passed to child process
result = cmd.stdout.read()
print result

# Write the second command
command = "echo $greeting world\n"
cmd.stdin.write(command)
cmd.stdin.flush() # Must include this to ensure data is passed to child process
result = cmd.stdout.read()
print result

What I expected to happen (based on the referenced answer) is that I see "hello world" printed. What actually happens is that it hangs on the first cmd.stdout.read(), and never returns.

Can anyone explain why cmd.stdout.read() never returns?

Notes:

  • It is absolutely essential that I run multiple bash commands from python within the same environment. Thus, subprocess.communicate() does not help because it waits for the process to terminate.
  • Note that in my real test case, it is not a static list of bash commands to execute. The logic is more dynamic. I don't have the option of running all of them at once.
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1  
Ah, see it now; I suspect you need to poll the pipes to see if there is any content at all. You could also try to just push the second command stdin pipe without reading from stdout. –  Martijn Pieters Mar 20 '13 at 21:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have two problems here:

  1. Your first command does not produce any output. So the first read blocks waiting for some.
  2. You are using read() instead of readline() -- read() will block until enough data is available.

The following modified code (updated with Martjin's polling suggestion) works fine:

import subprocess
import select

cmd = subprocess.Popen(['bash'], stdin=subprocess.PIPE, stdout=subprocess.PIPE)

poll = select.poll()
poll.register(cmd.stdout.fileno(),select.POLLIN)

# Write the first command
command = "export greeting=hello\n"
cmd.stdin.write(command)
cmd.stdin.flush() # Must include this to ensure data is passed to child process
ready = poll.poll(500)
if ready:
   result = cmd.stdout.readline()
   print result

# Write the second command
command = "echo $greeting world\n"
cmd.stdin.write(command)
cmd.stdin.flush() # Must include this to ensure data is passed to child process
ready = poll.poll(500)
if ready:
   result = cmd.stdout.readline()
   print result

The above has a 500ms timeout - adjust to your needs.

share|improve this answer
    
@MartjinPieters - Apologies (just noticed your comment). Was going to delete, but the read() vs readline() is important. –  isedev Mar 20 '13 at 21:58
    
Thank you for including the polling code. For someone who has never had to use that function, it was not obvious how to poll stdout for new data. –  Adam S Mar 20 '13 at 22:46

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