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When multiple const properties of a C++ class depend on some intermediate calculation, what is the simplest way to initialize them?

For example, how do I correct the constructor for the class below?

class MyClass {
public:
    const int a;
    const int b;

    MyClass() {
        int relatedVariable = rand() % 250;
        a = relatedVariable % 100;
        b = abs(relatedVariable - 150);
    }
};
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Can the expression for relatedVariable be made external to the class? So that you could pass it as a parameter into the constructor. –  ulidtko Mar 20 '13 at 22:11
1  
Look into initialization lists in c++ –  tcannon91 Mar 20 '13 at 22:17
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8 Answers 8

up vote 5 down vote accepted

With C++11, you can simply use a delegating constructor:

class MyClass
{
public:
    const int a;
    const int b;

private:
    MyClass( int relatedVariable )
      : a( relatedVariable % 100 ),
        b( abs( relatedVariable - 150 ) ) {}

public:
    MyClass() : MyClass( rand() % 250 ) {}
};
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Here's a roundabout solution using delegating constructors:

class MyClass
{
    MyClass(int aa, int bb) : a(aa), b(bb) { }

    static MyClass Maker() { int x = /* ... */; return MyClass(x * 2, x * 3); }

    int const a;
    int const b;

public:
    MyClass(MyClass const &) = default;
    MyClass() : MyClass(Maker()) { }
};
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error: type ‘MyClass’ is not a direct base of ‘MyClass’. –  ulidtko Mar 20 '13 at 22:26
    
@ulidtko: Try compiling with a current (as in bleeding edge) compiler and c++11 features turned on for that delegating constructor. –  Grizzly Mar 20 '13 at 22:35
1  
@ulidtko: This uses C++11 features. Your compiler might not support those. –  Kerrek SB Mar 20 '13 at 22:40
    
Okay, you're right. I used gcc 4.6, but delegating constructors are supported only in 4.7+. –  ulidtko Mar 20 '13 at 22:40
    
Adapted for ancient compilers. –  ulidtko Mar 20 '13 at 22:50
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Const is a contract between a class's user and implementor. It indicates that the class user should not modify the member variables, thus providing an immutable object design. It is fine for a constructor to otherwise initialize that state. That said, it might be better to hide these behind a private access qualifier and to provide accessors that allow read-only. The correct way to temporarily remove const-ness is using the const_cast<>.

class MyClass {
public:
   const int a;
   const int b;

MyClass() : a(0), b(0) {
    int relatedVariable = rand() % 250;
    const_cast<int&>(a) = relatedVariable % 100;
    const_cast<int&>(b) = abs(relatedVariable - 150);
}

};

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Is there any performance impact for this solution? Won't the compiler now assume that a and b aren't really const? –  Victor Lyuboslavsky Mar 20 '13 at 22:30
2  
It is doubtful that you will see any performance change at all. "const-ness" inside of a class is a compile-time notion. –  jbruni Mar 20 '13 at 22:37
1  
@jbruni, are you sure this is strictly legal? IIRC const_cast is only well-defined if the object itself is not const (i.e. you can cast a const T& to T& only if the reference refers to an object not originally declared const) –  Stephen Lin Mar 21 '13 at 1:20
1  
@jbruni see the first answer here: stackoverflow.com/questions/357600/is-const-cast-safe ; also, the quote "§7.1.​5.1/4 says Except that any class member declared mutable (7.1.1) can be modified, any attempt to modify a const object during its lifetime (3.8) results in undefined behavior" –  Stephen Lin Mar 21 '13 at 1:21
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My proposal:

class MyClass {
public:
    const int a;
    const int b;

    int relatedVariable; /* an overhead. */

    MyClass()
      : relatedVariable(rand() % 250)
      , a(relatedVariable % 150)
      , b(abs(relatedVariable - 150))
    {}
};
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2  
Member variables are initialized in the order of their declaration. Therefore this would initialize a and b before initializing relatedVariable, which kind of defeats its purpose. –  Grizzly Mar 20 '13 at 22:38
    
@Grizzly, correct. I should've declared relatedVariable before a and b. –  ulidtko Mar 20 '13 at 22:42
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You could do something like this - not pretty but should do the trick:

class MyClass {
public:
    const int a;
    const int b;
    static int relatedVariable;
    MyClass() :
        a(setRand()),
        b(relatedVariable)  {}
    static const int setRand()
    {
        relatedVariable = rand() % 250;
        return relatedVariable;
    }
};
int MyClass::relatedVariable = 0;
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Why separate function for rand() % 250? You could use that in the initializer directly. –  ulidtko Mar 20 '13 at 22:17
1  
This isn't threadsafe. Probably doesn't matter, but just FYI. –  Wug Mar 20 '13 at 22:32
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In case if you are stuck with an ancient compiler which doesn't support delegating constructors, here's the same approach adapted for the older language version:

class MyClassBase {
public:
    const int a;
    const int b;
    MyClassBase(int a, int b) : a(a), b(b) {}
};

class MyClass : public MyClassBase {
    static MyClassBase Maker() {
        int x = rand() % 250;
        return MyClassBase(x % 100, abs(x - 150));
    }
public:
    using MyClassBase::a;
    using MyClassBase::b;

    MyClass() : MyClassBase(Maker()) { }
};
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Introduce an intermediate class that does the calculation:

class ConstCalc {

   public:
    ConstCalc(int related) : rv(related){}

    int a() const { return rv % 100; } 
    int b() const { return abs( rv - 150 ) ; } 

   private:
    const int rv;
};

class MyClass {
public:
    const int a;
    const int b;

    MyClass( const ConstCalc c ) : a( c.a() ), b( c.b() ) {
    }
};
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You could make a and b private, and provide getters to access their values from outside the class.

class MyClass
{
private:
    int a, b; // private
public:
    int getA() { return a; }
    int getB() { return b; }

    MyClass()
    {
        int relatedVariable = rand() % 250;
        a = relatedVariable % 100;
        b = abs(relatedVariable - 150);
    }
};

Or, you could just use subobject initializers and cache the random number somehow. Turning the optimization on might even remove the temporary variable in the generated program text.

class MyClass
{
private:
    int temp; // this is a workaround
public:
    const int a;
    const int b;

    MyClass() : temp(rand() % 250), a(temp % 100), b(abs(temp - 150)) {}
};

Remember that subobject construction happens in the order that members are declared in the class, and that the order of subobjects in the initialization list is ignored.

Or, you can be lazy, and only store the initial random number, and generate a, b on demand.

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1  
"will probably detect the overlapping computation" - it won't, because rand() has side effects. –  ulidtko Mar 20 '13 at 22:32
    
But rand() is only called once. Any method of caching the result will produce the same output, regardless of what bizarre trick is used to do it. The memory a, b will not be mapped into read-only memory, and what the optimizer does to it is its own prerogative. But I see what you mean and I'll reword it. –  Wug Mar 20 '13 at 22:36
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