Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am currently trying to input a text file, separate each word and organize them into a list.

The current problem I'm having is getting rid of commas and periods from the text file.

My code is below:

#Process a '*.txt' file.
def Process():
    name = input("What is the name of the file you would like to read from? ")

    file = open( name , "r" )
    text = [word for line in file for word in line.lower().split()]
    word = word.replace(",", "")
    word = word.replace(".", "")

    print(text)

The output I'm currently getting is this:

['this', 'is', 'the', 'first', 'line', 'of', 'the', 'file.', 'this', 'is', 'the', 'second', 'line.']

As you can see, the words "file" and "line" have a period at the end of them.

The text file I'm reading is:

This is the first line of the file.

This is the second line.

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

These lines have no effect

word = word.replace(",", "")
word = word.replace(".", "")

just change your list comp to this:

[word.replace(",", "").replace(".", "") 
 for line in file for word in line.lower().split()]
share|improve this answer
    
Did they use to have an effect? For some reason my teacher told us to look at them? –  Keyfer Mathewson Mar 20 '13 at 22:54
    
@KeyferMathewson You never use word again in your code. –  jamylak Mar 20 '13 at 23:04
    
They don't have an effect in this case because after the list comprehension is done, word will always be a reference to the last word in your list of words. @jamylak's version of the code correctly does the replacements on each word in the list as it's being handled. –  bgporter Mar 20 '13 at 23:05

Maybe strip is more appropriate than replace

def Process():
    name = input("What is the name of the file you would like to read from? ")

    file = open(name , "r")
    text = [word.strip(",.") for line in file for word in line.lower().split()]
    print(text)
>>> help(str.strip)
Help on method_descriptor:

strip(...)
    S.strip([chars]) -> string or unicode

    Return a copy of the string S with leading and trailing
    whitespace removed.
    If chars is given and not None, remove characters in chars instead.
    If chars is unicode, S will be converted to unicode before stripping
share|improve this answer
    
Huh, cool. Thanks so much! I'll try this now. ...Annd it works. –  Keyfer Mathewson Mar 20 '13 at 22:57

Try this:

 chars = [',', '.']

 word.translate(None, ''.join(chars))
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.