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I'm interfacing with an MS Excel document via Powershell. There is a possibility of each excel document of having around 1000 rows of data.

Currently this script seems to read the Excel file and write a value to screen at a rate of 1 record every .6 seconds. At first glance that seems extremely slow.

This is my first time reading an Excel file with Powershell, is this the norm? Is there a faster way for me to read and parse the Excel data?

Here is the script output (trimmed for readability)

PS P:\Powershell\ExcelInterfaceTest> .\WRIRMPTruckInterface.ps1 test.xlsx
3/20/2013 4:46:01 PM
---------------------------
2   078110
3   078108
4   078107
5   078109
<SNIP>
242   078338
243   078344
244   078347
245   078350
3/20/2013 4:48:33 PM
---------------------------
PS P:\Powershell\ExcelInterfaceTest>

Here is the Powershell script:

########################################################################################################
# This is a common function I am using which will release excel objects
########################################################################################################
function Release-Ref ($ref) {
    ([System.Runtime.InteropServices.Marshal]::ReleaseComObject([System.__ComObject]$ref) -gt 0)
    [System.GC]::Collect()
    [System.GC]::WaitForPendingFinalizers()
}

########################################################################################################
# Variables
########################################################################################################

########################################################################################################
# Creating excel object
########################################################################################################
$objExcel = new-object -comobject excel.application 

# Set to false to not open the app on screen.
$objExcel.Visible = $False

########################################################################################################
# Directory location where we have our excel files
########################################################################################################
$ExcelFilesLocation = "C:/ShippingInterface/" + $args[0]

########################################################################################################
# Open our excel file
########################################################################################################
$UserWorkBook = $objExcel.Workbooks.Open($ExcelFilesLocation) 

########################################################################################################
# Here Item(1) refers to sheet 1 of of the workbook. If we want to access sheet 10, we have to modify the code to Item(10)
########################################################################################################
$UserWorksheet = $UserWorkBook.Worksheets.Item(2)

########################################################################################################
# This is counter which will help to iterrate trough the loop. This is simply a row counter
# I am starting row count as 2, because the first row in my case is header. So we dont need to read the header data
########################################################################################################
$intRow = 2

$a = Get-Date
write-host $a
write-host "---------------------------"

Do {

    # Reading the first column of the current row
    $TicketNumber = $UserWorksheet.Cells.Item($intRow, 1).Value()

    write-host $intRow " " $TicketNumber    

    $intRow++

} While ($UserWorksheet.Cells.Item($intRow,1).Value() -ne $null)

$a = Get-Date
write-host $a
write-host "---------------------------"

########################################################################################################
# Exiting the excel object
########################################################################################################
$objExcel.Quit()

########################################################################################################
#Release all the objects used above
########################################################################################################
$a = Release-Ref($UserWorksheet)
$a = Release-Ref($UserWorkBook) 
$a = Release-Ref($objExcel)
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If the data is static (no formulas involved, just data in cells), you can access the spreadsheet as an ODBC data source and execute SQL (or at least SQL-like) queries against it. Have a look at this reference for setting up your connectionstring (each worksheet in a workbook will be a "table" for this exercise), and use System.Data to query it the same as you would a regular database (Don Jones wrote a wrapper function for this which may help).

This should be faster than launching Excel & picking through cell by cell.

share|improve this answer
    
That is very interesting, I'll give it a shot tomorrow and see how it performs. –  ProfessionalAmateur Mar 21 '13 at 2:02
    
This is great. Insanely faster. –  ProfessionalAmateur Mar 22 '13 at 18:24

In his blog entry Speed Up Reading Excel Files in PowerShell, Robert M. Toups, Jr. explains that while loading to PowerShell is fast, actually reading the Excel cells is very slow. On the other hand, PowerShell can read a text file very quickly, so his solution is to load the spreadsheet in PowerShell, use Excel’s native CSV export process to save it as a CSV file, then use PowerShell’s standard Import-Csv cmdlet to process the data blazingly fast. He reports that this has given him up to a 20 times faster import process!

Leveraging Toups’ code, I created an Import-Excel function that lets you import spreadsheet data very easily. My code adds the capability to select a specific worksheet within an Excel workbook, rather than just using the default worksheet (i.e. the active sheet at the time you saved the file). If you omit the –SheetName parameter, it uses the default worksheet.

function Import-Excel([string]$FilePath, [string]$SheetName = "")
{
    $csvFile = Join-Path $env:temp ("{0}.csv" -f (Get-Item -path $FilePath).BaseName)
    if (Test-Path -path $csvFile) { Remove-Item -path $csvFile }

    # convert Excel file to CSV file
    $xlCSVType = 6 # SEE: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb241279.aspx
    $excelObject = New-Object -ComObject Excel.Application  
    $excelObject.Visible = $false 
    $workbookObject = $excelObject.Workbooks.Open($FilePath)
    SetActiveSheet $workbookObject $SheetName | Out-Null
    $workbookObject.SaveAs($csvFile,$xlCSVType) 
    $workbookObject.Saved = $true
    $workbookObject.Close()

     # cleanup 
    [System.Runtime.Interopservices.Marshal]::ReleaseComObject($workbookObject) |
        Out-Null
    $excelObject.Quit()
    [System.Runtime.Interopservices.Marshal]::ReleaseComObject($excelObject) |
        Out-Null
    [System.GC]::Collect()
    [System.GC]::WaitForPendingFinalizers()

    # now import and return the data 
    Import-Csv -path $csvFile
}

These supplemental functions are used by Import-Excel:

function FindSheet([Object]$workbook, [string]$name)
{
    $sheetNumber = 0
    for ($i=1; $i -le $workbook.Sheets.Count; $i++) {
        if ($name -eq $workbook.Sheets.Item($i).Name) { $sheetNumber = $i; break }
    }
    return $sheetNumber
}

function SetActiveSheet([Object]$workbook, [string]$name)
{
    if (!$name) { return }
    $sheetNumber = FindSheet $workbook $name
    if ($sheetNumber -gt 0) { $workbook.Worksheets.Item($sheetNumber).Activate() }
    return ($sheetNumber -gt 0)
}
share|improve this answer
    
Does the Import-CSV give you the ability to select specific cell and column data? –  ProfessionalAmateur Mar 21 '13 at 17:13
    
Best practices for a command-line utility (going back to the Unix days) is that it should do one thing well. So Import-Csv just imports the whole thing. But then you just apply the power of PowerShell, typically Where-Object to select rows, Select-Object to select columns. –  Michael Sorens Mar 21 '13 at 18:45
    
Hmm Ill check it out. Going to be tough because the excel data is not formatted consistently. Columnar data is not uniform the entire way day. I'll play with it and see. I might need to have powershell save the excel doc as a CSV as is because there isn't going to be any user interaction getting these documents. –  ProfessionalAmateur Mar 21 '13 at 19:06
    
This works superfast and great! Only issue I have is that it's having difficulties with special characters like 'é' and 'ê'. I tried different types of CSV numbers, but none seem to work. –  DarkLite1 Aug 6 at 13:47
    
Awesome! The solution was simple. Instead of channging the value $xlCSVType = 6, I had to change this Import-Csv -path $csvFile -Encoding Default. Hope it helps anyone :) –  DarkLite1 Aug 6 at 13:55

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