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I have many resource files, in many different languages.

Lets suppose for example we are supporting 3 languages (en, de, fr), and have this file:

common.resx common.de.resx common.fr.resx

I would like to detect occurrences when for instance a resource is requested in de, but is missing and so reverts to the default language. Is there any way of catching this? (so I can log it and later add the missing resource).

Thanks

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you want to catch the differences use RESX Synchronizer. It is an open source app that can synchornize all differences from main resx to localized one (it adds and/or removes keys in the localized resource).

You can use it as follows to copy all changes from common.resx to common.de.resx:

resxsync /v common.resx common.de.resx

The /v option list all changes that is all keys that were added to or removed from the de resx.

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+1 Automating that seems straight forward and useful! –  Greg Oct 19 '09 at 21:21
    
This tool is dicontinued. The project it links to as an alternative is discontinued too. –  LueTm Aug 10 '12 at 10:27

Assuming that all resource file changes start in development and make their way to production, this seems like a job for some form of static analysis.

I use Zeta Resource Editor because it highlights areas that are missing translations and also placeholders (e.g. {0}).

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Resharper has this great feature http://www.jetbrains.com/resharper/features/internationalization.html#Code_Inspections_for_Resource_Files

ReSharper warns you whenever a specific resource value is not overridden in a specific culture

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There's nothing in the existing resource reading API that exposes fallbacks externally. However, System.Resources.ResourceManager is not sealed, so there's nothing stopping you from subclassing it to raise an event when fallback is required.

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