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Can someone look over this code and point out why the resulting barnsley fern fractal doesn't look right?

function barnsley (ctx) {

ctx.fillStyle = 'green';
ctx.translate(ctx.canvas.width/2,ctx.canvas.height/2);
var self = this;

this.itts = 100000;
this.ittsCount = 0;
this.x = 0;
this.y = 0;

this.main = function () {
    for (var i=0;i<itts;i++) {
        var rand = Math.random()*100;
        if (rand < 1) {
            self.one();
        } else if (rand < 86) {
            self.two();
        } else if (rand < 94) {
            self.three();
        } else {
            self.four();
        }
    }
}

this.one = function () {
    var xn = self.x;
    var yn = self.y;
    var zx = 0;
    var zy = 0.16 * yn;
    self.drawPoint(zx,zy);
}

this.two = function () {
    var xn = self.x;
    var yn = self.y;
    var zx = 0.85 * xn + 0.4 * yn;
    var zy = -0.04 * xn + 0.85 * yn + 1.6;
    self.drawPoint(zx,zy);
}

this.three = function () {
    var xn = self.x;
    var yn = self.y;
    var zx = 0.2 * xn - 0.26 * yn;
    var zy = 0.23 * xn + 0.22 * yn + 1.6;
    self.drawPoint(zx,zy);
}

this.four = function () {
    var xn = self.x;
    var yn = self.y;
    var zx = -0.15 * xn + 0.28 * yn;
    var zy = 0.26 * xn + 0.24 * yn + 0.44;
    self.drawPoint(zx,zy);
}

this.drawPoint = function (xn,yn) {
    self.x = xn;
    self.y = yn;
    ctx.fillRect(xn*20,-yn*20,1,1);
}

this.main();
}

It has the right general shape but I must be missing something, I've checked the algorithms and such but to no avail. Any help is greatly appreciated.

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1  
can ya make a jsfiddle? or what is ctx? :| –  Ronnie Mar 20 '13 at 23:43
    
@Ronnie a <canvas> context (ctx is the typical name for one) –  Doorknob 冰 Mar 20 '13 at 23:44
    
I don't understand why people are voting to close this as not constructive, this is a well-defined question and does not warrant discussion or subjective answers. –  Peter Olson Mar 20 '13 at 23:50
    
@Doorknob thanks, I had a feeling it had to do with canvas, but ctx.canvas confused me. I thought it'd be canvas.ctx. Never played around with it. Seeing Peter's jsfiddle makes sense now –  Ronnie Mar 20 '13 at 23:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There was just a small error while typing the numbers. (I checked against this source, it looks like it uses the same numbers you are using).

In this this.two functions, you need to change

var zx = 0.85 * xn + 0.4 * yn;

to

var zx = 0.85 * xn + 0.04 * yn;

You can see this fix in action on jsFiddle.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very much. Seems like one number out of all of them can make all the difference. –  robjtede Mar 21 '13 at 7:12
    
"one number out of all of them" --- this is the whole point of chaos theory, of which fractals are a part, that the output of some functions is sensitive to the exact input given. For more read James Gleick's chaos book; very approachable. –  Phil H Mar 25 '13 at 14:52

There are millions of way to do it but I think you might like this one .

Updates/steps are handled by the JS scheduler/timers. It's non-blocking and won't have your CPU go crazy with a heavy for loop.

The fractal data is also handled a different way. You could put any fractal made with affine transforms just by changing the parameters at one place. You also don't have to sum the probabilities as it does it for you.

ex: (StackOverflow won't let me post a JSFiddle link without a code exemple)

var probability_transforms =  [
    {
        "probability": 0.01, 
        "item": function(point){ return affine_transform(point, 0, 0, 0, 0.16, 0, 0) }
    },
    {
        "probability": 0.85, 
        "item": function(point){ return affine_transform(point, 0.85, 0.04, -0.04, 0.85, 0, 1.6) }
    },
    {
        "probability": 0.07,
        "item": function(point){ return affine_transform(point, 0.2, -0.26, 0.23, 0.22, 0, 1.6) }
    },
    {
        "probability": 0.07, 
        "item": function(point){ return affine_transform(point, -0.15, 0.28, 0.26, 0.24, 0, 0.44) }
    }
];

Have fun :)

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