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I have question regarding the code I found on Internet which uses a deque for finding the max of the element --

 #include <iostream>
 #include <deque>

 using namespace std;


 void test(int arr[], int n)
 {    
   std::deque<int>  Qi(n); 
   int i;
   for (i = 0; i < n; ++i)
   {
      while ( (!Qi.empty()) && arr[i] >= arr[Qi.back()])
        Qi.pop_back();  // Remove from rear

      Qi.push_back(i);
   }
  cout << arr[Qi.front()];   
}

// Driver program to test above functions
int main()
{
   int arr[] = {12, 1, 78, 90, 57, 89, 56};
   int n = sizeof(arr)/sizeof(arr[0]);    
   test(arr, n);
   return 0;
}

My Question is how is Qi.front() giving the right index when I have not done any Qi.push_front() ?

But the following code gives me a 0

  void test(int arr[], int n)
 {    
   std::deque<int>  Qi(n); 
   int i;
   for (i = 0; i < n; ++i)
   {           
      Qi.push_back(i);
   }
   cout << arr[Qi.front()];   
}

Sorry If I am sounding stupid .. New to deques ...

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
This is a convoluted way of doing this task. You can actually replace std::deque by std::vector and it would still work same way and would be even more effective (but will be still convoluted). You just need one int to find biggest element or one index. –  Slava Mar 21 '13 at 0:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

std::deque<int> Qi(n); creates a deque with n elements, all zero. The push_back operations add further elements at the back, so afterwards the deque has 2 * n elements. Qi.front() is identical to Qi[0].

All this is well-documented, e.g. here.

share|improve this answer
    
Are you sure about this: "so afterwards the deque has 2 * n elements"? –  Slava Mar 20 '13 at 23:49
    
Ahhh ... Thanks a lot ... So basically using std::deque<int> Qi; then doing a push_back(10) gives the same value as front(). Thanks a lot for clarification. –  Fox Mar 20 '13 at 23:51

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