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I have a question regarding complicated structures in Perl

my $data1 = [
  +{ id => 1, name => 'A' },
  +{ id => 2, name => 'B' },
  +{ id => 3, name => 'C' },
];

my $data3 = +{
   1 => +{ id => 1, name => 'A' },
   2 => +{ id => 2, name => 'B' },
   3 => +{ id => 3, name => 'C' },
};

How should I print "B"? What kind of data structure is that? And any nice reference on Perl nested structures (hash references, array references, etc.) that is eay to understand?

Thank you in advance

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1  
Do you know Data::Dumper ? –  sputnick Mar 21 '13 at 0:14
    
yes but im trying to do it without using modules –  ado Mar 21 '13 at 0:14
3  
tutorial on data structures might be a good start for complex data structures like you have here. –  Chris Charley Mar 21 '13 at 0:17
2  
I'm not sure what those + are doing in there?! –  aidan Mar 21 '13 at 0:22
5  
+ disambiguates in places where the braces could be taken to be a code block instead of an anonymous hash reference, but one rarely needs that. I'm guessing the code contains them out of a misplaced desire to be clear and consistent with places where it could be ambiguous. –  rra Mar 21 '13 at 0:34

1 Answer 1

Try doing this :

print $data1->[1]->{name}; # ARRAY ref
print $data3->{2}->{name}; # HASH ref

This is de-reference from a perl ARRAY and HASH ref.

The -> de-reference explicitly. It's only needed for the first "floor", ex :

print $data1->[1]{name};
print $data3->{2}{name};

Works too. The 2nd and more are optionals.

Like Chris Charley said, take a look to the tutorial on data structures


To help you understanding what your scalar ref looks like, use Data::Dumper , ex :

print Dumper $data1;
print Dumper $data3;

Should output :

$VAR1 = [
          {
            'name' => 'A',
            'id' => 1
          },
          {
            'name' => 'B',
            'id' => 2
          },
          {
            'name' => 'C',
            'id' => 3
          }
        ];
$VAR1 = {
          '1' => {
                   'name' => 'A',
                   'id' => 1
                 },
          '3' => {
                   'name' => 'C',
                   'id' => 3
                 },
          '2' => {
                   'name' => 'B',
                   'id' => 2
                 }
        };

For the +{ } syntax, rra gives a good response :

disambiguates in places where the braces could be taken to be a code block instead of an anonymous hash reference, but one rarely needs that. I'm guessing the code contains them out of a misplaced desire to be clear and consistent with places where it could be ambiguous.

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Thanks a lot! It does print now and by the answer you gave I somehow got an idea of what kind of thingies these are –  ado Mar 21 '13 at 0:19
    
Glad to help you =) –  sputnick Mar 21 '13 at 0:20
2  
Note that you don't always have to be explicit about dereferencing. After the first ->, using more of them to dereference is optional - $data1->[1]{name} is equivalent to $data1->[1]->{name}. –  Dave Sherohman Mar 21 '13 at 9:56
    
Added a note about that –  sputnick Mar 21 '13 at 11:26
1  
Btw, I really dislike perldsc, its a crutch giving recipes for each situation. To really understand references I like to point people to perldoc perlreftut which makes it nice and clear. –  Joel Berger Mar 21 '13 at 14:00

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