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This is a map navigation application. Maybe this functionality is available off the shelf, but it will be a really meaty learning exercise to build it from scratch. Python 2.6 under windows XP.

As an OO design, I have a map class, based on tk.canvas, which is scrollable. This will pick up its background by downloading tiles from openstreetmap, and I don't have a problem with that (yet). The map scrolls just fine.

Created as children of the map are a number of instances of an edittable path class. This class will contain all the functionality required to load/save/edit/display the paths. The path is a list of coordinate tuples. The coordinates display as circles, the edges between them as lines. I want to be able to drag the circles to new positions.

I want this to be modeless if possible. So, when I am not over a path, dragging scrolls the map. When I'm over the path, and activefill shows I am, I edit the path.

I start to have trouble trying the commented out statements in the vertex_drag function. In the first, where I am trying to move the vertex, I get an error with the wrong number of arguments, got 2 instead of the expected 0 or 4, and the map drags. In the second, I do get a trail of new circles in what appear to be the right places, and the map still drags.

What I need to do is suppress the map scroll when I'm dragging a vertex. I have googled and found the assertion that if I put break in the first event handler, the event won't propagate down from widget to parent. However, if I do that, python complains that I've used a break outside a loop. Is that because an oval is not a widget but something else, or have I been looking at 3.0 documentation in error?

How can I do this, in a way that maintains the nice objecty seperation between map and path handling? I think I can think of some ways that might, with kludgy stuff between the two.

import Tkinter as tki

class Map(tki.Canvas):
    """ will implement a scrollable by dragging slippy map background"""
    def __init__(self, parent):
        tki.Canvas.__init__(self, parent)        
        self.config(height=600, width=600, xscrollincrement=1,yscrollincrement=1)

        self.bind('<ButtonPress-1>',self.grab)
        self.bind('<ButtonRelease-1>',self.release)
        self.bind('<B1-Motion>',self.drag)

        # before we get the map, this will do
        for x in range(-500, 500, 100):
            for y in range(-500, 500, 100):
                self.create_text((x,y), anchor=tki.CENTER, text='{0} {1}'.format(x,y), activefill = 'red')       

    def grab(self,event):
        self._y = event.y
        self._x = event.x
        self.config(cursor='fleur')

    def release(self,event):
        self.config(cursor='arrow')

    def drag(self, event):
        self.yview('scroll',self._y-event.y,'units')
        self.xview('scroll',self._x-event.x,'units')
        self._y = event.y
        self._x = event.x

class Path():
    """ maintains an edittable path as a sequence of coordinates, drawn on the map"""
    def __init__(self, parent, route):
        self.parent=parent
        self.path=route
        self.draw_path(self.path)        

    def draw_path(self, path):
        """ draws the list of coordinates supplied in the arguments
        creates a list of edges and vertices, binding them to handlers"""

        self.vs=[]
        V_RAD=7
        self.edges=[]
        LINE_WIDTH=3

        (xl, yl)=self.path[0]
        self.vs.append(self.parent.create_oval(xl-V_RAD, yl-V_RAD, xl+V_RAD, yl+V_RAD, activefill='blue', tag='vertex'))

        for (xn, yn) in self.path[1:]:
            self.vs.append(self.parent.create_oval(xn-V_RAD, yn-V_RAD, xn+V_RAD, yn+V_RAD, activefill='blue', tag='vertex'))
            self.edges.append(self.parent.create_line(xl, yl, xn, yn, activefill='blue', width=LINE_WIDTH, tag='edge'))
            (xl, yl)= (xn, yn)

        self.parent.tag_bind('vertex', '<ButtonPress-1>', self.vertex_click)
        self.parent.tag_bind('vertex', '<B1-Motion>', self.vertex_drag)
        self.parent.tag_bind('vertex', '<ButtonRelease-1>', self.vertex_release)
        self.parent.tag_bind('edge', '<ButtonPress-1>', self.edge_click)        

    def vertex_click(self,event):
        print 'vertex clicked ', event
        cx=self.parent.canvasx(event.x)
        cy=self.parent.canvasy(event.y)        
        d=self.parent.find_closest(cx,cy)[0] # closest returns a 1-tuple of an ID, not an ID
        print 'we think ',d, ' is the one thats clicked'
        self.moving_vertex=d
        print event.widget

    def vertex_drag(self,event):
        print 'vertex dragging ', event
        cx=self.parent.canvasx(event.x)
        cy=self.parent.canvasy(event.y)
        print cx,cy

        # self.parent.coords(self.moving_vertex,(cx,cy))
        # self.parent.create_oval(cx-5, cy-5, cx+5, cy+5)

        self.parent.update_idletasks()

    def vertex_release(self,event):
        print 'vertex released ', event

    def edge_click(self, event):
        print 'edge clicked', event     


if __name__ == '__main__':

    root=tki.Tk()
    background_map=Map(root)
    background_map.pack()
    route1=[(10,20), (100,100), (100,0), (150, -30), (100, -100)]
    path=Path(background_map, route1)    
    root.mainloop() 
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In the call to self.parent.coords commented in vertex_drag, you are passing the offset as a tuple. Actually, in the 4 expected arguments you have to count the canvas as the first one (self), plus three more arguments: the ID of the item, the horizontal offset, and the vertical offset.

self.parent.move(self.moving_vertex, dx, dy)

To ignore an event handler, you don't have to use the break statement, but return the string "break" in the event handler. However, in this scenario you can do something easier: set a flag as False when you click on the item, and set it as True again when you release it:

class Map(tki.Canvas):
    def __init__(self, parent):
        tki.Canvas.__init__(self, parent)
        self.can_drag = True
        #...

    def drag(self, event):
        if self.can_drag:
            self.yview('scroll',self._y-event.y,'units')
            self.xview('scroll',self._x-event.x,'units')
            self._y = event.y
            self._x = event.x

class Path():
    #...

    def vertex_click(self,event):
        self.parent.can_drag = False
        cx=self.parent.canvasx(event.x)
        cy=self.parent.canvasy(event.y)
        d=self.parent.find_closest(cx,cy)[0] # closest returns a 1-tuple of an ID, not an ID
        self.offset = cx, cy
        self.moving_vertex = d

    def vertex_drag(self,event):
        cx = self.parent.canvasx(event.x)
        cy = self.parent.canvasy(event.y)
        dx = cx-self.offset[0]
        dy = cy-self.offset[1]
        self.parent.move(self.moving_vertex, dx, dy)
        self.offset = cx, cy

    def vertex_release(self,event):
        self.parent.can_drag = True
share|improve this answer
    
Break doesn't work. Perhaps that's because a line/oval on the canvas isn't a widget? Setting a flag False was the sort of kludgy thing I was anticipating and was trying to avoid, it creates a not very clean backdoor between the classes. However, it works, and it's the workaround I'm going with. I did change the ovals/lines to real widgets, Buttons, for a while, and while these do stop the events getting out of the class, without needing break, getting the right look and feel for the application was not going well. –  Neil_UK Mar 21 '13 at 19:37
    
@Neil_UK Why kludgy? The coupling is forced by your class design: Every method of Path already uses self.parent, so for this kind of events it is also necessary access members between the classes. –  A. Rodas Mar 21 '13 at 19:52
    
@ A Rodas. Duh, yes, it dawned on me today that the Map and Path classes have their hands in each others' pockets already, and it's going to get worse before I'm finished, like a Map zoom must force a path redraw. I will stop worrying about that bit, they are never going to be used one without the other. I wonder what a more pure OO design would look like? –  Neil_UK Mar 22 '13 at 18:53
    
@Neil_UK If you want to make path information independent of Map, you can move all the Path methods that use canvas to Map. Then you can update the values of the vertices and edges of the path when the user drag them. –  A. Rodas Mar 22 '13 at 23:40
    
@A Rodas. Map and Path were twins unfairly seperated at birth. Moving everything into Map makes things a lot easier. The phrase 'class design' has been mentioned a couple of times above, I think 'design' might be stretching it a bit :-) Thanks for your feedback. –  Neil_UK Mar 24 '13 at 7:49

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