Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have to tables, say A and B and a common column X which isn't nullable.

Query 1:

SELECT COUNT(*)
FROM A
WHERE A.X in                       
(SELECT distinct(B.X) FROM B)

Query 2:

SELECT COUNT(*)
FROM B
WHERE B.X in
(SELECT distinct(X) FROM A)

Query 3:

SELECT COUNT(*)
FROM A, B
WHERE A.X=B.X

Query 1 results 5990. Query 2 and 3 results 6222. Removing distinct or checking distinct count on top doesn't change the results. Can someone explain why the results aren't the same for all queries as they all return intersection count?

share|improve this question
    
They aren't the same logically: Your results imply that there are more non-distinct values in A.X : sqlfiddle.com/#!3/67623/7 – Mitch Wheat Mar 21 '13 at 0:31
1  
moving the distinct to the count(Distinct *) may work if they are infact all fields duplicated. count(distinct X) would result in the same count across tables as you would be eliminating duplicates. – xQbert Mar 21 '13 at 0:36
    
distinct(*) didn't work, because the whole row wasn't the same. it's distinct(X) which is worked. – İsmet Alkan Mar 29 '13 at 12:40
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Assume A has values A B C

Assume B has values A B C D E C

in this case A would have a count of 3 (QRY1) while B would have a count of 4 since c is repeated (QRY2) when you use a join C will match will all values of C has more duplicates than A. A may have duplicates but fewer of them. 4 again (QRY3)

share|improve this answer
    
I had to select count(distinct X). – İsmet Alkan Mar 21 '13 at 18:31

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.