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While populating an array with data from a SimpleXML call, PHP throws exception to what it believes as 'Undefined' keys, however, the output is actually correct.

$doc = new SimpleXmlElement($http_result, LIBXML_NOCDATA);

$result = array();

$x = 0;

foreach($doc->users->user as $item) {
    $result['user'][$x]['id'] .= $item->id;
    $result['user'][$x]['name'] .= $item->name;
    $result['user'][$x]['email'] .= $item->email;
    $x++;
}

print json_encode($result);

This actually outputs what I expect, i.e. {"user":[{"id":"4843977","name":"Test New User","email":"test@newuser.com"}]}

However, the following errors are also present, and I'm not totally sure why - this doesn't appear in 5.2.6 but does for 5.2.10

Notice: Undefined index: user in /var/vhosts/sys-dev/docs/file.php on line 36

Notice: Undefined offset: 0 in /var/vhosts/sys-dev/docs/file.php on line 36

Notice: Undefined index: id in /var/vhosts/sys-dev/docs/file.php on line 36

Notice: Undefined index: name in /var/vhosts/sys-dev/docs/file.php on line 37

Notice: Undefined index: email in /var/vhosts/sys-dev/docs/file.php on line 38

Notice: Undefined offset: 1 in /var/vhosts/sys-dev/docs/file.php on line 36

Notice: Undefined index: id in /var/vhosts/sys-dev/docs/file.php on line 36

Notice: Undefined index: name in /var/vhosts/sys-dev/docs/file.php on line 37

Notice: Undefined index: email in /var/vhosts/sys-dev/docs/file.php on line 38

Notice: Undefined offset: 2 in /var/vhosts/sys-dev/docs/file.php on line 36

Notice: Undefined index: id in /var/vhosts/sys-dev/docs/file.php on line 36

Notice: Undefined index: name in /var/vhosts/sys-dev/docs/file.php on line 37

Notice: Undefined index: email in /var/vhosts/sys-dev/docs/file.php on line 38
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4 Answers 4

I think You must change just ".=" to "=" in lines:

$result['user'][$x]['id'] = $item->id;
$result['user'][$x]['name'] = $item->name;
$result['user'][$x]['email'] = $item->email;
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That'll get rid of most of the errors, but won't get rid of Notice: Undefined offset: 1 in /var/vhosts/sys-dev/docs/file.php on line 36. –  Dominic Rodger Oct 12 '09 at 10:16
    
Maybe try it in loop (without $X): $result['user'][] = array( 'id' => $item->id, 'name' => $item->name, 'email' => $item->email ); –  Kamilos Oct 12 '09 at 10:35
    
This ends up outputting {"user":[{"id":{"0":"4843977"},"name":{"0":"Test New User"},"email":{"0":"test@newuser.com"}}]} which is usable. Although I can see and understand why .= probably shouldn't be used, it was the only way I could get readable JSON output. –  jakeisonline Oct 12 '09 at 10:38
    
".=" or "=" doesn't read the JSON output, it just assign value to the var on the left. Now You don't have yet $result['user'][$x]['id'] index then must create it with "=". –  Kamilos Oct 12 '09 at 10:46

You don't define what are $result['user'] and $result['user'][$x]. You need to instantiate them as array so you won't get that error.

$result['user'] = array();
foreach($doc->users->user as $item) {
    $result['user'][$x] = array();
    $x++;
}

For the undefined indexes in the fields, the problem is similar. You use ".=" when the variable doesn't exists yet. So you should instantiate it first with an empty string.

$result['user'][$x]['name'] = '';
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2  
The initialization of the arrays is not necessary. Even the multi-dimensional attributes are initialized the moment they are filled for the first time –  Dan Soap Oct 12 '09 at 10:22

You need to initialize the $result array first:

$result = array('user' => array());

And since you’re using the string concatenation and assignment operator .=, that would also apply to the $result['user'][$x] arrays:

foreach($doc->users->user as $item) {
    $result['user'][$x] = array(
        'id'    => null,
        'name'  => null,
        'email' => null
    );
    $result['user'][$x]['id'] .= $item->id;
    $result['user'][$x]['name'] .= $item->name;
    $result['user'][$x]['email'] .= $item->email;
    $x++;
}

But that’s not necessary since you can also write it like this:

$result = array('user' => array());
foreach($doc->users->user as $item) {
    $result['user'][] = array(
        'id'    => $item->id,
        'name'  => $item->name,
        'email' => $item->email
    );
}


Edit    Since we elaborated that the attributes of $item are SimpleXMLElement objects too, $item->attr[0] is required to address the string value itself. Thus:

$result = array('user' => array());
foreach($doc->users->user as $item) {
    $result['user'][] = array(
        'id'    => $item->id[0],
        'name'  => $item->name[0],
        'email' => $item->email[0]
    );
}
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What’s wrong? Why did this answer got voted down? –  Gumbo Oct 12 '09 at 10:25
    
Not sure why it was voted down. Anyway, this solution works, but yields the same results as all other answers so far: {"user":[{"id":{"0":"4843977"},"name":{"0":"Test New User"},"email":{"0":"test@newuser.com"}}]} which isn't really valid JSON output –  jakeisonline Oct 12 '09 at 10:37
    
@jakeisonline: The item attributes like $item->id are probably not strings but some other objects instead. So try something like $item->id[0]. –  Gumbo Oct 12 '09 at 11:31
    
@gumbo: you're right, it's adding them as an SimpleXMLElement Object. Referring to it using $item->id[0] seems to make no difference, as it still shows as [id] => SimpleXMLElement Object ( [0] => 4802022 ) when your print_r the array, which means a further array is being added to the JSON output (or, indeed, any output) –  jakeisonline Oct 12 '09 at 11:57
    
@gumbo: thanks for revising your answer, much appreciated. However, this still outputs odd data. For example: Array ( [user] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [id] => SimpleXMLElement Object ( [0] => 4802022 ) [name] => SimpleXMLElement Object ( [0] => Dropbox Test User..... I'm at a loss as to why it's dumping the object reference as opposed to just the string/value. –  jakeisonline Oct 12 '09 at 14:13

It happens, because you're not just setting the array values, but you're concatenating to the current value:

$result['user'][$x]['id'] .= $item->id;

This line means "take the current value of $result['user'][$x]['id'] and add $item->id to it". The notice is then thrown, because the current value is not yet existent.

Amend the code to this

$result['user'][$x]['id'] = $item->id;

and you should be safe. No idea though, why 5.2.6 is not throwing the errors, maybe you should check with the error_reporting setting in the php.ini.

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