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I am just observing the reasons for segmentation fault. I malloced memory here but still it is giving seg fault. What might be the reasons for this?

#include<stdio.h>
#include<unistd.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

void main()
{
    int **matrix,i,j;
    matrix = malloc(sizeof(int));
    **matrix = 10;
    printf("%d", **matrix);

}
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Enable compiler warnings, and you will discover the problem. –  Oli Charlesworth Mar 21 '13 at 0:42
    
Think of the type of matrix and what you are trying to do with **matrix = 10 –  Chris Mar 21 '13 at 0:44
    
main should return int. The rest is secondary. –  wildplasser Mar 21 '13 at 0:49
    
**matrix is a pointer to pointer and you allocate memory for *matrix only. Not for **matrix, so you can not(should not) derefrence it(as you are doing in printf();). –  linuxD Mar 21 '13 at 5:24
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

matrix is a pointer (it happens to be a pointer to a pointer to int), and you've allocated memory (though probably not enough) for it to point to.

*matrix is also a pointer (it happens to be a pointer to int), and you haven't allocated memory for it to point to, so *matrix contains garbage (or doesn't exist if your malloc() call didn't allocate enough memory).

So dereferencing *matrix has undefined behavior. You were lucky enough for the symptom to be obvious.

Why are you allocating sizeof(int) bytes for matrix to point to?

And why are you defining void main() rather than the correct int main(void)? (void main() is mostly useful as a way to detect books and tutorials written by authors who don't know the language very well.)

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Thank you Keith. matrix = malloc(sizeof(int *)); *matrix = malloc(sizeof(int)); Solved my problem. –  Shreyas Kale Mar 21 '13 at 0:55
1  
You mean Herb Schildt, by any chance ;-? –  wildplasser Mar 21 '13 at 0:56
    
@wildplasser: Yes, for example. –  Keith Thompson Mar 21 '13 at 2:30
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Because you are not allocating memory properly. matrix is a pointer that points to a integer pointer not just an integer pointer.

The correct way to do this would be:

(Warning: I type this directly on the browser, do not use it in production)

#include<stdio.h>
#include<unistd.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

void main()
{
    int **matrix,i,j;
    matrix = (int **) malloc(sizeof(void *));
    *matrix = (int *) malloc(sizeof(void *));
    **matrix = 10;
    printf("%d", **matrix);

    free(*matrix);
    free(matrix);
    return 0;
}

It is easier to understand what is going on by imagining how the memory would look like in each line ( address | type | value {value_type}):

        int **matrix,i,j;
stack:
    matrix:  0x00 | &int ** | NULL {int **}
    i:       0x04 | &int    | GARBAGE {int}
    j:       0x08 | &int    | GARBAGE {int}

Because virtual memory, it is usual that Operative Systems initialize memory with 0 (or NULL) but as this is not granted it is bad programming to count with that.

        matrix = (int **) malloc(sizeof(void *));

malloc will return an address of an space on the heap:

stack:
    matrix:  0x00 | &int ** | 0xA0 {int **}
    i:       0x04 | &int    | GARBAGE {int}
    j:       0x08 | &int    | GARBAGE {int}
heap:
    *matrix: 0xA0 | &int *  | GARBAGE {int *}
        *matrix = (int *) malloc(sizeof(void *));
stack:
    matrix:  0x00 | &int ** | 0xA0 {int **}
    i:       0x04 | &int    | GARBAGE {int}
    j:       0x08 | &int    | GARBAGE {int}
heap:
    *matrix: 0xA0 | &int *  | 0xA4 {int *}
    **matrix:0xA4 | &int    | GARBAGE {int}
        **matrix = 10;
stack:
    matrix:  0x00 | &int ** | 0xA0 {int **}
    i:       0x04 | &int    | GARBAGE {int}
    j:       0x08 | &int    | GARBAGE {int}
heap:
    *matrix: 0xA0 | &int *  | 0xA4 {int *}
    **matrix:0xA4 | &int    | 10 {int}
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sizeof(int)

stores size for and int, whilist

sizeof(*int)

stores size to a pointer to int. You are reserving the size of an int and not the size of an *int. This is what is causing the problems.

Also you should allocate the int to a *int pointer if you want also to do some real computations.

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1  
No, this is not the cause of the problem. –  Oli Charlesworth Mar 21 '13 at 0:45
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