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Im working on creating a game where a proverb is displayed in a table. When you click on one of the letters (or td) then it displays the letter.

I used javascript to create the table, after removing spaces/author/etc. Here is the code I used to create the table.

function createRow(tableRowId, startIndex, endIndex) {
    var row = document.getElementById(tableRowId);
    var index = startIndex;

    while(index <= endIndex){
        //hints array contains the letters to be displayed
        if(hints[index] != undefined){
            var newCell = row.insertCell(-1);
            var newText = document.createTextNode(hints[index]);
            newCell.appendChild(newText);
        }
        else{
            break;
        }
        index++;
}

The problem I have is that onclick wont work with the td that were just created.

var cells = document.getElementsByTagName("td");
cells.onclick = function (){
    cells.style.backgroundColor = "white";
}

I must be missing a step or something, maybe some small error in my code. Maybe there is a better way of doing this. All the source can be found here. http://wikisend.com/download/831324/lab4.zip

share|improve this question
2  
Can you setup a working jsfiddle.net demo? Also, try to take the jQuery! "answers" with a grain of salt. You can easily do this without a bulky script library. –  Jared Farrish Mar 21 '13 at 1:25
1  
Hint: Think delegate, as in delegate a click from a parent like the table and utilize el.addEventListener('click', function(e){...}) to attach the click handler. Note, IE8 and lower require the alternate el.attachEvent('onclick', function(e){...}). The MDN site shows how to handle that. –  Jared Farrish Mar 21 '13 at 1:31
    
.addEventListener() is a good solution, but in the simple demo on MDN it makes it so if anywhere in the table is clicked, the function is run. I need it so only one cell is changed at a time. –  lordflapjack Mar 21 '13 at 1:42
    
It gets a lot easier if you eschew browsers which do not support document.querySelectorAll. Anyhow, that's beside the point about addEventListener(). See my answer and I'll edit in something for the related cells updated. –  Jared Farrish Mar 21 '13 at 1:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I'll update with a method to toggle the highlight to only one cell.

EDIT

Ok, here is a method to remove the blue class and add it to the one which was clicked:

// Remember el.attachEvent('onclick', ...) for IE8 and lower
base.addEventListener('click', function delegate(e){
    var cells = tbody.getElementsByClassName('blue'),
        i = 0,
        cell;

    while (cell = cells[i++]) {
        cell.className = cell.className.replace(/\bblue\b/g, '');
    }

    e.target.className += ' blue';
});

http://jsfiddle.net/xwgyK/1/

This uses el.getElementsByClassName(), which is supported by most modern browsers and IE9 and greater. An alternative, of course, could be to do another tbody.getElementsByTagName('td'), which is universally supported.

EDIT 2

Note, I noticed sometimes it's possible not to click a TD, so we should first check for that and ignore the click on table if it's not a td:

base.addEventListener('click', function delegate(e){
    var cells = tbody.getElementsByClassName('blue'),
        i = 0,
        cell;

    if (e.target.nodeName.toLowerCase() == 'td') {
        while (cell = cells[i++]) {
            cell.className = cell.className.replace(/\bblue\b/g, '');
        }

        e.target.className += ' blue';
    }
});

http://jsfiddle.net/xwgyK/2/

HTML

<table id="base">
    <tbody></tbody>
</table>

Javascript

var base = document.getElementById('base'),
    tbody = base.getElementsByTagName('tbody')[0],
    numrows = 30,
    numcols = 10,
    col = 0,
    row = "<tr>{row}</tr>",
    rows = "",
    cell = "<td>{cell}</td>",
    cells = "";

// Remember el.attachEvent('onclick', ...) for IE8 and lower
base.addEventListener('click', function delegate(e){
    e.target.style.backgroundColor = 'blue';
});

while (numrows--) {
    cells = "";
    col = 0;

    while (col++ < numcols) {
        cells += cell.replace('{cell}', col);
    }

    rows += row.replace('{row}', cells);
}

tbody.innerHTML = rows;

http://jsfiddle.net/xwgyK/

share|improve this answer
    
Wow this looks great in jsfiddle. I'm obviously new to javascript though, your code is a bit over my head haha. Is each line in the beginning declared as a variable? Doesn't the while loop need a condition or does it just stop when numrows == 0? –  lordflapjack Mar 21 '13 at 1:57
    
Yes; declaring all of your variables with var is almost always preferable to not doing so (which creates global variables otherwise, which are discouraged in general). I use a comma syntax and each on a new line because I think it's easy to scan, instead of all on one line or a bunch of unnecessary vars scattered everywhere. To your second question, if while (condition), that will stop once the condition evaluates to false(y). I think it's cleaner than unwieldy for loops, if you're careful. I updated my answer as well with the adjustment I mentioned. –  Jared Farrish Mar 21 '13 at 2:04
    
So what would be an advantage or using getElementsByClass instead of getElementsByTag, since the latter is universally supported? Also in the addEventListener function you use a parameter "e" but I'm not quite sure where that function is called. –  lordflapjack Mar 21 '13 at 2:05
    
Not much. If you were to decide you don't care about IE8 or lower, you could (and probably should) use document.querySelectorAll('#base tbody td.blue') instead (using my markup and classing for example); it's much more elegant. Note, I did something a lot like this in this fiddle for another question the other day. You can see how jQuery can handle it relatively easy, but learn the full DOM/vanilla methods too. And e is from the event, whereby it gets the event object that's passed into the handler. e.target is the element that was clicked. –  Jared Farrish Mar 21 '13 at 2:10
    
Thank you so much for your help! I solved the problem I believe by putting the addEventListener in an existing function that creates the table. Since the getElementsByTagName was outside the function that created the table the list was null. Thanks again for your help –  lordflapjack Mar 21 '13 at 2:12

Use jQuery here instead of straight js. My bet is that your listener for the click event is only bound to the items that are present when you bind it (the onclick function). If you set up a listener through jQuery, then it will fire even on components that are dynamically added.

share|improve this answer

Did you try using jQuery?

$(document).on('click', 'td', function(e) { cells.style.backgroundColor = "white"; });

I am not sure, but I believe that you'll have to explicitly attach the click function to the newly added cell if you're not using a framework. It will probably be simplest to create the function separately

function onClickHandler (){
    cells.style.backgroundColor = "white";
}

Attach the function to the cells on init

cells.onclick = onClickHandler;

and then attach it to the every element upon creation

newCell.onclick = onClickHandler;

Not sure if there's a more straight forward solution, hope it helps.

share|improve this answer

Ohh, actually if you try to alert the type of cells, you will get the answer why the the click is not triggered.

In this case, cells is an NodeList object, which is a array of HTMLTableCellElement.

you should iterate the cells and add onclick event like following:

for(var i=0; i<cells.length; i++) {
     cells[i].onclick = function () {
         cells[i].style.backgroundColor = "white";
     }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This looks pretty close but it still doesn't work. You are correct that each cell is a NodeList object, which is probably why onclick is being a pain. –  lordflapjack Mar 21 '13 at 1:39
    
you can add a debug point such as alert(1) in the onclick function to make sure whether the click function is triggered. sorry,actually ` cells.style.backgroundColor = "white";` should be ` cells[i].style.backgroundColor = "white";` consistently. –  Leo Huang Mar 21 '13 at 1:41
    
Thanks, yeah the cells[i] I added and tried to put an alert(1) but no alert was thrown :p –  lordflapjack Mar 21 '13 at 1:45
    
The problem is about the DOM render, I downloaded your codes, you can alert the length of the cells under line 124 var test = cells.length;, you will find the browser will alert "0", that is because when those javascript codes are execute, the table in the html are not rendered yet. –  Leo Huang Mar 21 '13 at 1:57
    
Oh great! Thanks for doing that, I was guessing that is the problem but I did not have a good solution. Should I address the problem from a different angle or try and get this to work? –  lordflapjack Mar 21 '13 at 2:02

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