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If there's an existing Java class pkg.Test,

package pkg;
public class Test {
  public int v;
  public Test(int v) { this.v = v; }
}

attempting to make an extractor by defining a scala companion object

package pkg
object Test{
  def unapply(t : Test) : Option[Int] = Some(t.v)
}

produces the error "Test is already defined as object Test". However, everything seems to work if I make a synonym for the java class in a new package

package pkg
package object matchers {
  type Test = pkg.Test
}

and define a corresponding object in the new package

package pkg.matchers
object Test {
  def unapply(t : Test) : Option[Int] = Some(t.v)
}

Now both the pattern and all members of the original class are available from the new package

import pkg.matchers._
object main {
  def main(args : Array[String]) {
    val t = new Test(1)
    t match {case Test(v) => println(v)}
    println(t.v)
  }
}

It seems odd that adding a type synonym lets this work. Besides having to use a new package, are there any problems with adding pattern matching this way? Is there any way to make the extractor available in the original package?

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is because when interact with Java libraries, Scala needs a way to map Java's static method to Scala's singleton object.

For example, if you have the following Java class:

package pkg;

class Test {
  public static void printHello() {
    System.out.println("Hello");
  }
}

How can we invoke printHello in Scala? It will looks like the following:

import pkg.Test
Test.printHello()

As you can see, the syntax is exactly same as invoke an method in object Test. From this point's of view, Test singleton is already defined, and you can't define an object with same FQN twice.

That's why you need define pkg.matchers.Test so it will not conflict with pkg.Test.

And Scala's compiler is smart enough to figure out that pkg.matchers.Test is a singleton which could not construct it using new keyword, so when you write new Test(1), it is pkg.Test instead of pkg.matchers.Test. This is why you could use them at same time in your code example.

In fact, you don't need type Test = pkg.Test at all, the following is working fine:

package pkg

package matchers {
  object Test {
    def unapply(t : Test) : Option[Int] = Some(t.v)
  }
}

object main {

  import pkg.matchers._

  def main(args : Array[String]) {

    val t = new Test(1)
    t match {case Test(v) => println(v)}
    println(t.v)
  }
}

Update

Extractor don't need to be a companion object, which means you don't need corresponding classes. Any object with unapply method could work as extractor.

object StringLength {
  def unapply(x: String): Option[Int] = Some(x.length)
}

object Main {

  def main(args: Array[String]) {

    "Hello World" match {
      case StringLength(x) => println("length:" + x)
    }
  }
}

So if the main method is not in the pkg, you have the following choice:

  1. Rename your extractor to another name, so compiler could know that you're using extractor.

  2. Using FQN, so compiler knows you're access pkg.matchers.Test instead of pkg.Test.

    package pkg.matchers {
    
      import pkg._
    
      object Test { 
        def unapply(t : Test) : Option[Int] = Some(t.v)
      } 
    }
    
    object Main {
    
      def main(args: Array[String]) {
    
        import pkg.Test
    
        val t = new Test(1)
        t match {case pkg.matchers.Test(v) => println(v)}
        println(t.v)
    
      }
    
    }
    
  3. Rename pkg.Test to another name with import syntax, so it won't conflict with pkg.matchers.Test.

    object Main {
    
      def main(args: Array[String]) {
    
        import pkg.{Test => JTest}
        import pkg.matchers.Test
    
        val t = new JTest(1)
        t match {case Test(v) => println(v)}
        println(t.v)
    
      }
    }
    
  4. Just import everything from pkg, with import pkg.matcher.Test specifically.

      def main(args: Array[String]) {
    
        import pkg._
        import pkg.matchers.Test
    
        val t = new Test(1)
        t match {case Test(v) => println(v)}
        println(t.v)
    
      }
    
share|improve this answer
    
How would this work if main wasn't in or under pkg? I see not conflicting with the static parts of pkg.Test is important, and that the extractor isn't actually a companion object, but the scoping is confusing. Adding an explicit import of pkg.Test to the start of main produces an error that the "Test" in the pattern is ambiguous because it's imported twice, while somehow getting it just from being in the same package works. – Brandon Mar 21 '13 at 6:10
    
Only your fourth option does what I'm looking for - having the pattern and the original class both accessible unqualified. I don't see anything in the spec explaining why import pkg._ should be any different from explicitly importing all the names, but changing the line to import pkg.Test produces the same variable as before. Still, that's probably another question. Thanks for the help on this. – Brandon Mar 21 '13 at 19:31

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