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Usually, the C# compiler is smart about method binding and type argument inference. But I seem to have stumped it.

class Obj
{
    void Handler( int a, int b ) { }

    Obj() { Method( "", Handler ); }

    public void Method<T>( T t, Action<T> action ) { }

    public void Method<T, U>( T t, Action<U, U> action ) { }
}

The Method call results in the compiler error:

Argument 2: cannot convert from 'method group' to 'System.Action'`.

Why doesn't the compiler notice that the call fits the second overload? I'm able to compile it by making the call more explicit as in Method<string, int>( "", Handler ) or Method( "", (Action<int, int>)Handler ). But why is this necessary?

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2  
As a test, eliminate the first overload with Action<T>. You still do not compile, so let's forget overloading for a second. Focus on the algorithm for type inference and method group conversions. If you care to follow through, you may find section 7.5.2 if the C# language specification interesting. –  Anthony Pegram Mar 21 '13 at 2:27
    
@AnthonyPegram thanks, I didn't notice that. –  HappyNomad Mar 21 '13 at 2:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Let's take Anthony's suggestion and just consider:

class Obj
{
    void Handler( int a, int b ) { }
    Obj() { Method( "", Handler ); }
    public void Method<T, U>( T t, Action<U, U> action ) { }
}

Overload resolution fails. Why? Well, we must infer T and U. Clearly T is string. What is U?

This bit is important: we deduce what U is after we know what Handler is. Now, you might say that we know what Handler is because there's only one thing it could be. But there is no rule of C# that says that if there's only one method in a method group that it automatically wins the overload resolution game. The rule is that the meaning of Handler is determined by running overload resolution on the method group associated with Handler. Overload resolution considers arguments and we don't have any arguments for Handler because the only argument list we could possibly have is (U, U), and U is what we're trying to determine in the first place.

So overload resolution fails here. Now, if we had:

class Obj
{
    double M(string s) { }
    Obj() { Method( "", M ); }
    public void Method<T, U>(T t, Func<T, U> f) { }
}

That works fine. We infer T is string, and now we can do overload resolution on M, determine that M means double M(string s), and now we know that U is double.

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This helped me understand the issue more clearly, thanks. Too bad the compiler isn't just a little bit smarter. It would make the method I wrote much more concise to use. –  HappyNomad Mar 22 '13 at 0:57

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