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The following code snippet works:

<a id="btnCapturePhoto" data-role="button" href="#page1">Capture Photo</a>
<script type="text/javascript">
$($("#btnCapturePhoto").click(function captureImage() {
    alert('capture button clicked');
}));
</script>

This code does NOT work:

<script type="text/javascript">
$($("#btnCapturePhoto").click(function captureImage() {
    alert('capture button clicked');
}));
</script>
<a id="btnCapturePhoto" data-role="button" href="#page1">Capture Photo</a>

Why? I'm having trouble understanding the relationship between the script tag placement and the HTML tags to which they are associated. In some cases I have placed a script tag above the HTML tag (such as for the JQueryIU datepicker) and that script works, such as:

<script type="text/javascript">
$(function() {
    $("#myinput").datepicker();
});
</script>
<input type="text" id="myinput" />

Could someone please explain when to place code above or below the HTML tag?

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1  
Do you see how your first 2 examples do not conform to jQuery's ready api? (See the last example in the "All three of the following syntaxes are equivalent" section). –  Crescent Fresh Mar 21 '13 at 2:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I agree with the answers stated above, but I think it would be helpful to you to explain the issue and then offer some advice for the future.

ANSWER: The browser loads your HTML from top to bottom and therefore executes your javascript first. Since your JS is loaded first the element it is looking for is not yet loaded and therefore does not yet exist. This is the reason why it fails.

ADVICE: Typically it is good advice to load your CSS in your head and JS at the end of your body just before the tag.

<html>
<head>
    <!-- your CSS should go here -->
</head>
<body>
    <SomeElement></SomeElement>
    <SomeElement></SomeElement>
    <SomeElement></SomeElement>
<script type="text/javascript>
    //your javascript code
</script>
</body>
</html>

The reason you typically want to do this is because it will allow your DOM to be ready before executing any JS code. This means you can circumvent the ready event needing to be fired before you execute your code. This also means that in the event that your page requires external JS files that may take a while to load your users can at least see some parts of the DOM before they are loaded. This can work to your advantage if you are loading a rather large single page application. This link has some good information when it comes to designing your web page and could probably be helpful along your journey of learning HTML, CSS and JS. http://developer.yahoo.com/performance/rules.html

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In the example that does not work, your jQuery code tries to find #btnCapturePhoto, but

<a id="btnCapturePhoto" data-role="button" href="#page1">Capture Photo</a>

does not yet exist in the DOM because it is listed after the jQuery code in the source file.

Using the form:

$(function() {
    $("#myinput").datepicker();
});

ensures that the DOM is fully loaded before your jQuery code runs, so the ID is indeed found. $(function()... runs when the document is ready.

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You should be placing all of your scripts in an external .js file and loading it in at the bottom of your HTML, after jQuery.

But let's look at the reason your particular code is working and not working.

<a id="btnCapturePhoto" data-role="button" href="#page1">Capture Photo</a>
<script type="text/javascript">
$($("#btnCapturePhoto").click(function captureImage() {
    alert('capture button clicked');
}));
</script>

This works because the element #btnCapturePhoto exists when your script is executed.

<script type="text/javascript">
$(function() {
    $("#myinput").datepicker();
});
</script>
<input type="text" id="myinput" />

This works because you're wrapping your script inside a short-hand document ready handler (that's $(function(){.. this part)

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In your first two examples, you are binding a handler to the click event of your anchor immediately after that script loads. The first example works because the anchor that your script is referencing loaded immediately before the script.

In the second example, the anchor is loaded after your script has tried to select it so nothing is found and no handler is bound to the click event.

In your third example your are using $(function() { ..., which is the equivalent to $(document).ready(function() {.... This waits until the DOM is fully loaded (a.k.a all HTML on your page is registered by the Javascript engine) and then executes the script in the handler.

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