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Hi friends I am practicing structures. I have these two functions one returns the structure and I copy that to the local struct in main. My second function changes those local struct members by entering different entities. Now I have printed result after calling each function, to my surprise I notice that printed result after both the function are same. I am unable to understand what is happening here…can you guys please explain me…thanks!

 #include <stdio.h>
 #include <stdlib.h>

 struct student{
        char name[30];
        float marks;
        };


 struct student read_student();
 void read_student_p(struct student student3);
 void print_student(struct student student2);

 int main()
 {
     struct student student1;
     student1 = read_student();
     print_student(student1);
     read_student_p(student1);
     print_student(student1);
     system("pause");
     return 0;
 }

 //This is my first function
 struct student read_student()
 {
      struct student student2;
      printf("enter student name for first function: \n");
      scanf("%s",&student2.name);

      printf("enter student marks for first function:\n");
      scanf("%f",&student2.marks);

      return student2;
 }

//function to print 
void print_student(struct student my_student)
{
    printf("Student name in first function is : %s\n",my_student.name);
    printf("Student marks in first function are: %f\n",my_student.marks);
};

 //My second function  
 void read_student_p(struct student student3)
 {    
      printf("enter student name for second function: \n");
      scanf("%s",&student3.name);
      printf("enter student marks for second function: \n");
      scanf("%f",&student3.marks);
 }
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2  
What happens, and what do you expect to happen? –  Patashu Mar 21 '13 at 3:04
    
It prints the same name and marks even after calling the second function...you can see that in second function we are again entering new name and new marks ....i expect it to print that –  studyembedded Mar 21 '13 at 3:07

3 Answers 3

Do you mean to write

void read_student_p(struct student* student3)
                                  ^
{    


read_student_p(&student1);
               ^

You need to pass a pointer to read_student_p if you want to modify the struct that you are passing. Currently it is passed by value, and the modifications are lost.

Considering the _p suffix, I expect that this was intended..

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Thanks buddy i understood...thanks! –  studyembedded Mar 21 '13 at 3:11

When you do this:

read_student_p(student1);

And the method looks like this:

void read_student_p(struct student student3)
{    

  printf("enter student name for second function: \n");
  scanf("%s",&student3.name);
  printf("enter student marks for second function: \n");
  scanf("%f",&student3.marks);

 }

Structs in C are passed by value, not by reference.

So what read_student_p does is take a copy of the struct you pass in (student1), edit the copy, and then do nothing.

One solution would be to return the changed version of the struct. Another version would be to pass a pointer to a struct, and edit the struct via pointer (so that you're editing the same copy of the struct directly).

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In the second function read_student_p you were calling by value, which is to say, you defined a new struct variable tmp in the function, and copied the value of student1 to this tmp value. All the modifications that you've done were on tmp value, which wouldn't affect student1.

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