Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
gcc 4.7.2
c89

Hello,

I have the following code that I am testing that will not modify the rtp stream.

#define DO_MODIFY_RTP
#ifdef DO_NOT_MODIFY_RTP
    if(modify_rtp_media_stream(channel->ipm) == FALSE) {
        status = FALSE;
    }
#endif

When I want to test the modify rtp stream I will set the #define to this:

#define DO_MODIFY_RTP
#ifdef DO_MODIFY_RTP
    if(modify_rtp_media_stream(channel->ipm) == FALSE) {
        status = FALSE;
    }
#endif

Eventfully this will be controlled by a property in a configuration file. But I am just testing both cases before I do that.

Does it seem strange to use #define like this?

Many thanks for any suggestions,

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Usually, you don't want to have to modify the source code, so you'd probably do something like this:

#undef MODIFY_RTP
#if defined(DO_NOT_MODIFY_RTP)
#define MODIFY_RTP 0
#else
#define MODIFY_RTP 1
#endif

if (MODIFY_RTP)
{
    if (modify_rtp_media_stream(channel->ipm) == FALSE)
        status = FALSE;
}

On the compiler command line you can have -DDO_NOT_MODIFY_RTP, or in a configuration header you can write #define DO_NOT_MODIFY_RTP, and the RTP stream will not be changed. By omitting the definition of the DO_NOT_MODIFY_RTP macro, the function will be called and the RTP stream could be modified.

Or you can invert the condition so that the default is not to modify the stream:

#if defined(DO_MODIFY_RTP)
#define MODIFY_RTP 1
#else
#define MODIFY_RTP 0
#endif

The big advantage of the code shown is that it is always compiled — but the optimizer will eliminate the call to modify_rtp_media_stream() if MODIFY_RTP is 0. This means that the compiler checks the syntax of the statement, so it doesn't get out of date as the code around it changes. Debug code tends to decay if it is not compiled as the code around it changes but the compiler doesn't notify you of the problems because the preprocessor removed the code so that the compiler proper doesn't see it.

share|improve this answer
    
Just to add another further question. I have done the following for the compiler flags -D_DO_MODIFY_RTP to modify the rtp. And -DNDO_MODIFY_RTP for not modifying the rtp. And then modified this to #if defined(_DO_MODIFY_RTP) would that be suffice? Thanks. –  ant2009 Mar 21 '13 at 5:11
    
Beware names starting with an underscore and a capital letter; they are reserved for the implementation for any use. What you describe would probably work; it is perhaps more often done along those lines. The trickiest bit is deciding what to do if both the positive and the negative macros are set. You could generate an error (#error) or decide that one wins over the other. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 21 '13 at 5:23

If the macro is going to used in other files besides that single one, I would advise against doing this. If someone else is going to read the code - they'll have to navigate to another file to find what the macro is defined as.

#define is usually meant to replace text literals or constants that you will be using everywhere like 'true' or 'false'. In this case, if someone uses this and "status" is not being defined or instantiated, it'll throw an error.

Personally, I would just call it a function and name it appropriately as to what it's doing. Just have a function that returns 0 if false, or 1 if true would make it's usage clearer, and if someone else modifies the code less prone to ill-use.

If the project is large enough, you might forget what the #define is in six months, so think ahead and save yourself some pain.

share|improve this answer

Test positive

#define DO_MODIFY_RTP
#ifdef DO_MODIFY_RTP // 
if(modify_rtp_media_stream(channel->ipm) == FALSE) {
        status = FALSE;
    }
#endif 

Test negative

#define DO_MODIFY_RTP
#ifndef DO_MODIFY_RTP // 
if(modify_rtp_media_stream(channel->ipm) == FALSE) {
        status = FALSE;
    }
#endif 
share|improve this answer

The method you propose is not standard at all. I had to look closely to notice the macros were different, because in that configuration they are usually the same.

This is more common:

#define DO_MODIFY_RTP
#ifdef DO_MODIFY_RTP
    if(modify_rtp_media_stream(channel->ipm) == FALSE) {
        status = FALSE;
    }
#endif

or

#undef DO_MODIFY_RTP
#ifdef DO_MODIFY_RTP
    if(modify_rtp_media_stream(channel->ipm) == FALSE) {
        status = FALSE;
    }
#endif
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.