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I made a program in C++ in which I used two char arrays which i initialize at time of declaration and when I used strlen() function for calculating their lengths I got strange outputs. The code is shown below

#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>
#include<string>

using namespace std;

char consonant[] = {'b', 'c', 'd', 'f', 'g', 'h', 'j', 'k', 'l', 'm', 'n', 'p', 'q', 'r', 's', 't', 'v', 'w', 'x', 'y', 'z'};
char vowel[] = {'a', 'e', 'i', 'o', 'u'};



int main()
{
    int lenv, lenc;
    lenc = strlen(consonant);
    lenv = strlen(vowel);
    printf("lenv = %d and lenc = %d\n", lenv, lenc);
    return 0;
}

the output for above program when run on ideone is

lenv = 26 and lenc = 21

and when runs on windows using codeblocks is

lenv = 5 and lenc = 26

Please tell me the reason for such strange behaviour...

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3  
Talk about "strange behavior"... The title says C. The code is written in C. So why is there a C++ tag? –  Cody Gray Mar 21 '13 at 5:07
2  
using namespace std; and <string> make it C++... –  tjameson Mar 21 '13 at 5:07
4  
Don't forget the terminating nul character '\0'... –  Mysticial Mar 21 '13 at 5:08
5  
If the C compiler won't compile it, it's not C. –  Wug Mar 21 '13 at 5:09
5  
I don't understand this stance that people take. C and C++ share a common subset. Why is it that when someone presents code within that subset, and calls it C++, everyone declares it mis-tagged C? Can the opposite argument not also be made? That is, if the OP tags it C, can you not just as validly declare it mis-tagged C++? Of course not, in either case. If you need clarification about what language s/he is actually interested in, ask. Don't just change the language tag, thereby possibly preventing people from seeing the question who might have information relevant only to C++. –  Benjamin Lindley Mar 21 '13 at 5:38

3 Answers 3

No strange behavior here. Your strings are not nul-terminated, so there's no way for the strlen() function to identify where they end.

When you initialize your string like this:

char consonant[] = {'b', 'c', 'd', 'f', 'g', 'h', 'j', 'k', 'l', 'm', 'n', 'p', 'q', 'r', 's', 't', 'v', 'w', 'x', 'y', 'z'};

There's no nul char added. You can either make it a string (the double-quotes cause the compiler to automatically append the nul terminator):

char consonant[] = "bcd...z";

or you can include it yourself explicitly at the end of the array:

char consonant[] = {'b', 'c', 'd', 'f', 'g', 'h', 'j', 'k', 'l', 'm', 'n', 'p', 'q', 'r', 's', 't', 'v', 'w', 'x', 'y', 'z', '\0'};

Otherwise, strlen() will happily read off the end of your array until it happens to find a byte somewhere in memory with a value of 0.

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Undefined could be considered strange :) –  chris Mar 21 '13 at 5:08
    
strange, but expected! –  Jace Mar 21 '13 at 5:09

strlen can only be used on a string and not an arbitrary array of characters.

The strlen() function shall compute the number of bytes in the string to which s points, not including the terminating null byte. -- IEEE1003

The C++ standard says that strlen is C++ is identical to strlen in C. The C standard says:

The strlen function computes the length of the string pointed to by s. -- C99 7.21.6.3

And:

A string is a contiguous sequence of characters terminated by and including the first null character. -- C99 7.1.1

So you must ensure that whatever you pass to strlen is in fact a string, not just an array of characters.

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In fact, "an array of characters" is an string. In C, this is the way u usually define a string: char str[] = {"Test"}; But there's nothing wrong if you define each character on its own, as long as u don't forget the terminating 0-character. He forgot the Ascii-0, but I would still call it a string (although the end of string is outside his buffer) –  maja Jul 29 '13 at 14:37
2  
@maja David's post makes it abundantly clear that there's a distinction between a string and an array of characters. All strings are arrays of characters but not all arrays of characters are strings. As for what you would call things, that is irrelevant. What the standard calls things is what's important. –  Nik Bougalis Jul 29 '13 at 14:55
    
@NikBougalis: I agree, but if you want to really split hairs, then I think not all strings are arrays of characters in the sense that an array is a type, hence why the standard uses "contiguous sequence of characters" and "first null character". For instance, char myarray[6] = {'a', 'b', '\0', 'c', 'd', '\0'}; creates two strings, but only a single array has been created. –  Paul Griffiths Jul 29 '13 at 15:01
    
@PaulGriffiths: splitting hairs is good - I used the term 'array' as a shortcut for 'contiguous sequence'; while that's accurate, using it in a discussion dealing with standard legalese was probably not a good idea. –  Nik Bougalis Jul 29 '13 at 15:09
2  
@maja: The C standard also has no idea how your memory is laid out, or what's in it. While it may all be bits and bytes to your computer, it's not to C. The only way you get a "contiguous sequence of characters" in C is if you do something in your C program that guarantees you get that, like defining a char array. Once you overstep that, all bets are off. You can't point to whatever random garbage might happen to exist in your RAM and try to claim it's a conforming C string. –  Paul Griffiths Jul 29 '13 at 18:51

Other answers have already noted that you should close your c-style string with '\0' and your lenc=21 is most probably for some overflow phenomenon (it can be n*SIZE_MAX+21 with any n...).

To focus on how you can solve your problem properly in c:

#include<string.h>
#include<stdio.h>

char consonant[] = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvxyz"; /* this is automatically '\0' terminated */
char vowel[] = "aeiou";

int main()
{
    int lenv, lenc;
    lenc = strlen(consonant);
    lenv = strlen(vowel);
    printf("lenv = %d and lenc = %d\n", lenv, lenc);
    return 0;
}

Note that using namespace std is c++ only.

On the other hand a proper c++ solution looks like this:

#include<string>
#include<iostream>

std::string consonant("abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvxyz"); 
std::string vowel("aeiou");

int main()
{
    using namespace std; // if you wish using it, put it into a function

    int lenc = consonant.size();
    int lenv = vowel.size();
    cout << "lenv = " << lenc << " and " << "lenc = " << lenc << endl;
    return 0;
}
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