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I am a little confused by the way begin and end work they seem to me to be inconsistant. When going forward and backwards they have different behaviors.

vector<Actor *> a;
a.push_back(new Actor(11));
a.push_back(new Actor(22));
a.push_back(new Actor(33));
vector<Actor *>::iterator it = a.begin();


int x  =0;
while(a.begin()+x != a.end()){
cout << (*(a.begin()+x)) << "\n";
x++;
}

cout << "\n";

int y = 1; // if this is set to 0 then its a seg fault =/ when I access 
while(a.end()-y != a.begin()){
cout << (*(a.end()-y)) << "\n";
y++;
}

Outputs

0x979a008
0x979a028
0x979a018


0
0x979a018
0x979a028

How can I get the expected pattern

0x979a008
0x979a028
0x979a018

0x979a018
0x979a028
0x979a008
share|improve this question
    
A std::vector::end iterator is one-past-the-last-element of the container. It's how all the Standard Library container end() iterators work. –  Blastfurnace Mar 21 '13 at 5:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Note that begin() points to the first element of the vector, but end() points past the last element. It's never safe to dereference end(), but you can compare iterators to it.

If the vector is empty, then begin() == end(), and you may not dereference either one.

A more idiomatic way to loop over a vector's elements is:

for (vector<Actor*>::iterator i = a.begin(); i != a.end(); ++i) {
   // do something here
}

To iterate in reverse, it's simpler to use rbegin() and rend(), which work much the same way and begin()/end(), but iterate in reverse order:

for (vector<Actor*>::reverse_iterator i = a.rbegin(); i != a.rend(); ++i) {
   // do something here
}

Also, if you don't intend to modify the elements, you should use a const_iterator (or const_reverse_iterator instead.

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You should use reverse iterators:

int y = 0;
while(a.rbegin() +y != a.rend()){
    cout << (*(a.rbegin()+y)) << "\n";
    y++;
}

Or even better would be to use the overloaded ++ operator of the iterators themselves:

auto iter = a.rbegin();
while(iter != a.rend()){
    cout << *(iter++) << "\n";
}
share|improve this answer

One very simple way to achieve that would be following

// first element to the last
auto it = a.begin()
while (it != a.end())
{
cout<<*it<<"\n";
++it;
}
cout<<"\n"
// Last element to first
auto rit = a.rbegin()
while(rit != a.rend())
{
cout<<*rit<<"\n";
++rit;
}

NB: Do not try to dereference a.end() and beyond. When y = 0 in your program the a.end() is dereferenced in the line cout << (*(a.end()-y)) << "\n"; This results in seg fault. Elements of vector are contained in a sequence which can be accessed from begin() through end()-1. .end() points to one "past" the last element of the container and should not be dereferenced.

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std::for_each(a.begin(), a.end(), [](const Actor *& a){ std::cout << a; });
std::for_each(a.rbegin(), a.rend(), [](const Actor *& a){ std::cout << a; });



auto print_actor = [](const Actor *& a){ std::cout << a; };
std::for_each(a.begin(), a.end(), print_actor);
std::for_each(a.rbegin(), a.rend(), print_actor);
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