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I'm sure you've gone through this a lot of times, but I cannot figure out a thread witch really fits for my needs.

How can I get var inner to work in outertwo?

function outerOne(){

/* do something*/

    var inner = function(){
            return true 
    }; inner();

};
outerOne()


function outerTwo(){
    if (inner==true)
/* do something*/
};
outerTwo();

please note, I know it would be possible to declare var x outside to make it global. but what I like to achieve is to get the var out of the scope from inside the function

share|improve this question
    
What's the question? and why do you want to use other scope variable? –  gdoron Mar 21 '13 at 5:45
    
I want to make var x in outerTwo() work for example if I need to do if/else in outerTwo, which relies on x or something like that but how can I extend the scope of inner? –  Christoph Ha Mar 21 '13 at 5:47
    
I think you might be confusing variable declaration and variable assignment. Variables can be declared outside of the scope that they are assigned in. –  bmceldowney Mar 21 '13 at 6:03

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Have you tried:

var x;
function outerOne(){

    /* do something*/

    var inner = function(){
        x = 5
        console.log(x + "  Works in inner()");       
    }; 
    inner();

    console.log(x + "  Works in outerOne()");
};
outerOne();

function outerTwo(){
    console.log(x + "  Works in outerTwo()");
};
outerTwo();

Functions only share scope with variables declared in their parent scopes.

EDIT

For completeness sake I might add that nothing is preventing you from returning values form your functions:

function outerOne(){

    /* do something*/

    var inner = function(){
        var x = 5
        console.log(x + "  Works in inner()");
        return x;       
    }; 
    var x1 = inner();

    console.log(x1 + "  Works in outerOne()");
    return x1;
};
var x2 = outerOne();

function outerTwo(){
    console.log(x2 + "  Works in outerTwo()");
};
outerTwo();
share|improve this answer
    
:) I know that I could make it global this way, but what if I am not able to declare a var outside, because it resulting during the function (please referr to my comment above) –  Christoph Ha Mar 21 '13 at 5:54
    
Variables are declared by you, they do not result from functions. Functions return values that can be assigned to variables, but you are in control of when the variables are declared. –  bmceldowney Mar 21 '13 at 6:01
    
I agree and I described it quit bad, thought this would be more easy please see my edits above –  Christoph Ha Mar 21 '13 at 6:04
    
If what you are trying to say is that the variable declaration (not just the assignment) absolutely must happen within the inner function then I am sorry to inform you that you will not be able to use that variable anywhere else outside of that function. –  bmceldowney Mar 21 '13 at 6:08
    
great that's the answer I was looking for, even if I hoped there was a way to make it work, thank you –  Christoph Ha Mar 21 '13 at 6:10

Maybe you can restructure your code to something like this

var obj = 
    {
        outerOne : function(){return true;//or whatever logic you need here
                          },

        outerTwo : function(){  
           if(this.outerOne() === true){
               //do something
           }
        }
    }

    obj.outerTwo();
share|improve this answer
    
ok for this case it would work, but there are some other cases were it does not for example if the var in inner results because of an event elem.onclick = function (){ var inner = function(){ return true } } function outer(){ if(inner==true) / do something/ } –  Christoph Ha Mar 21 '13 at 5:51
    
If the variable is global it will be accessible from any function - including click events. Not sure I fully understand the problem –  TGH Mar 21 '13 at 5:55
    
I think I described it a bit bad, so please see my edits on the function –  Christoph Ha Mar 21 '13 at 5:57
    
The above code will give you access to methods defined on the same object.. –  TGH Mar 21 '13 at 6:16

Wrap your code in an IIFE. And set inner as an undefined variable at the top.

(function(){
var inner;

  function outerOne(){
  /* do something*/

      inner = function(){
         return true 
      }; inner();
  };
  outerOne()

  function outerTwo(){
      if (inner==true){
        //inner has been set to true, do something
      }
      else{
        //Inner has not been set to true, do something else
      }
  };
  outerTwo();

})();
share|improve this answer

Make variable 'x' global outside function.

var x = 0; 
function outerOne(){   
 //code block

var inner = function(){
        x = 5
       console.log(x + "  Works in inner()");       
}; inner();
console.log(x + "  Works in outerOne()");
};
outerOne()


function outerTwo(){
console.log(x + "  Works in outerTwo()");
};
outerTwo();
share|improve this answer
    
but what if x results because of something that happens to outerfunction, like onclick? –  Christoph Ha Mar 21 '13 at 5:53

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