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I recently had an exam on Java, and there was a wide section about wildcard generics in Java. However, there is very little said about their usage in practice. When should we use them? Let's see a typical usage:

void check(Collection<? extends Animal> list) {
  // Do something
}

What the documentation says, that this collection does not allow to add any elements to the list. So basically wildcards can be used for making collections read-only. Is that their only usage? Is there any practical need for that? For the last four years I took part in a lot of programming projects in Java, but I haven't seen any project that would use extensively such a feature as wildcard.

So, from the practical point of view, are there any situations when wildcard generics are unavoidable and necessary?

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Based on the contradicting answers, your question is pretty good. :-) –  Emil Vikström Mar 21 '13 at 6:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

So, from the practical point of view, are there any situations when wildcard generics are unavoidable and necessary?

I don't think they are 'unavoidable and necessary' because the Java compiler erases them anyway. However, when using them you get the benefit of a tighter type check during compile-time and you avoid type casting. Who wants to type cast anyway? :)

Guidelines for Wildcard Use

Type Erasure

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Thanks, I kinda missed this guideline, it explains the basic rules for wildard usage –  SPIRiT_1984 Mar 21 '13 at 7:24
void check(Collection<? extends Animal> list) {
  list.add(new Animal()); // compile time error
  list.add(new Dog()); // compile time error. Dog is subclass of Animal class. 
}

Java has develop such generics because to disallow the programmar to code whatever they want otherwise if it is allowed then later they will find a mess in run-time environment.

Sometime in programming you will get a scenario where your method check would not wan't to add element in the list but want to read those element.

You can only add null values.

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you are right, but please, quote a document. it sounds weird –  Nikolay Kuznetsov Mar 21 '13 at 7:04

In brief, what you are saying is wrong.

It has nothing to do to "make collections read-only".

We can still add elements to the input list, because Collection did declare a add(E) method.

The wildcard is straight-forward I think: You actually want to constraint the input type, because your logic is only reasonable for certain type.

For your example, your check maybe using some method of Animal

void check(Collection<? extends Animal> list) {
  // Do something
  for (Animal a : list) {
    a.checkAge();  // checkAge() is method of Animal
  }
}

Without ? extends Animal, the above code will not work, as the incoming list can be collection of anything (not Animal).

Therefore, we want to make sure the incoming collection to Collection or Collection etc, so that our code actually make sense as we are retrieving elements from the list and treated the element as Animal.

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