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I have following code of javascript

var Obj = {
    init: function () {
        this.over = $('<div />').addClass('over');
        $('body').append(this.over);
        $('.click').on('click', this.show);
    },
    show: function () {
        console.log(this.over);
    }
}

Obj.init();

When this does is when user clicks a .click link then it triggers show function and logs out the dom element created in init function. But the problem is then it logs out undefined. Why? How to solve it?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

try this :

var Obj = {
init: function () {
    this.over = $('<div />').addClass('over');
    $('body').append(this.over);
    $('.click').on('click', this.show);
},

show: function () {
    // here the 'this' is the button , not the obj object ..
    console.log($('.over'));
}
}

Obj.init();

another option :

var Obj = {
init: function () {
    this.over = $('<div />').addClass('over');
    $('body').append(this.over);
    var that = this;
    $('.click').on('click', function(e){
       that.show.call(that, e); // calling the show function with call, causing 'this' to be obj
    });
},

 // 'this' is the obj
show: function (e) {
    console.log(this.over);
}
}

Obj.init();
share|improve this answer
    
hope it helps , and solves your problem , if you need help understand something , let me know. –  IdanHen Mar 21 '13 at 7:31
    
Thank you for you help. One more thing can you look at this jsfiddle.net/SQGsZ/1 . Why me is not logged out? –  2619 Mar 21 '13 at 7:48
1  
Obj.me; => Obj.me(); // in line 9 ! –  IdanHen Mar 21 '13 at 7:50

The problem here is the scope of that this (Obj).

Use the following code to solve your problem.

var Obj = {
init: function () {
    this.over = $('<div />').addClass('over');
    $('body').append(this.over);
    $('.click').on('click', $.proxy(this.show, this));
},

show: function () {
    console.log(this.over);
}
};

Obj.init();

learn more about jQuery.proxy

share|improve this answer
    
context, not scope. –  Quentin Mar 21 '13 at 7:36

Because jQuery injects the DOM element that was clicked on into 'this' as opposed to the 'Obj' object. One solution is closure:

var Obj = {
  init: function () {
    this.over = $('<div />').addClass('over');
    $('body').append(this.over);
    $('.click').on('click', this.show());
  },

  show: function () {
    var self = this;
    return function () {
        console.log("over:", self.over);
    }
  }
}
Obj.init();
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You pass the function stored in this.show to on. When it gets called, it is not called in the context of Obj so this is not Obj.

You need to create a new function which isn't dependent on being called in the context of Obj.

The easiest way to do this is with bind:

$('.click').on('click', this.show.bind(this));

But this has limited browser support.

You can also use a closure:

var myObj = this;
var show = function () {
    myObj.show()
}
$('.click').on('click', show);
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When binding a function to an event with jquery, the context in which this function is called is the dom object that has been clicked.

var Obj = {
init: function () {
    this.over = $('<div />').addClass('over');
    $('body').append(this.over);
    var that = this;
    $('.click').on('click', function(){ 
        // console.log( this ) will log the dom object
        that.show.call( that ) 
     } );
},

show: function () {
    console.log(this.over);
}
}

Obj.init();
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