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I have a small question, what is the FASTEST way to scan for certain elements within a LARGE unsigned char array and a vector that contains only unsigned char elements? Straight answer would be great, but in-depth detailed answer would be awesome. What do I mean by fast? Basically, to search for certain characters within at least a second. I know that wasn't a very educated definition...

Note: The array is not sorted.

Common Declaration:

unsigned char* Array = new unsigned char[ 50000 ];
std::vector< unsigned char > Vec( 50000 );
/*
 * Fill Array & Vec with random bytes
 */

Lets say, I want to search for the letter 'a' in Array, I would simply write this loop to search for it:

Note: The searching process will be search for more than one elements. Mainly, 256. Hence, you can exploit that magic number.

For loop method:

unsigned int Count = 0;
for ( unsigned int Index = 0; Index != 50000; ++ Index )
   if( Array[ Index ] == 'a' ) Count ++;

std::count method:

unsigned int Count = std::count ( Array, Array + 50000, 'a' );

Are there any faster way to search for certain elements within Array?

Some IDEAS - Please don't give me a thumbs down for this! Its only an idea. I want some opinions.

Sorting

Would the speed be better if we made a copy of Array and sort it? Why make a copy? Well, because we need to keep the original content. The goal is to basically scan and count the occurrence of a character. Remember, speed matter. That means, the copying process must be fast.

Answer: No and its not worth it!

Why? Well, lets read this:

@Kiril Kirov:

Depends. If you plan to search for a single char - absolutely not. Copying the array is an expensive operation. Sorting it - even more expensive.

Well, if you will have only one array and you plan to search for, let's say, 100 different characters, then this method could give you a better performance. Now, this really depends on your usage. And nobody will be able to give you the absolutely correct answer for this case. You need to run it and profile.

*Scroll down to @Kiril Krov's informative post for more.

Answer: So far, there isn't a solid or an answer, because there isn't a really "fast" method to achieve this goal, especially when its not SORTED. However, threads could be a possible solution. But, watch out for our CPU! This was based on @Andrea's submitted answer (scroll down a little more for more info) - I hoped I read it right.

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1  
Wow, why down vote??? –  CLearner Mar 21 '13 at 7:51
    
First point - a vector of unsigned char is for all practical purposes identical to an unsigned char array, so maybe amend your question. –  Roger Rowland Mar 21 '13 at 7:53
1  
What ways can you think of? How is the array defined? How many dimensions? –  Kiril Kirov Mar 21 '13 at 7:54
1  
Good :) This is something else now :) –  Kiril Kirov Mar 21 '13 at 8:03
1  
Faster to execute? Not likely. Faster to write and comprehend? Certainly. unsigned int Count = std::count(Array, Array + 50000, 'a'); –  Benjamin Lindley Mar 21 '13 at 8:04

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

As others wrote, the complexity of the best algorithm is O(n), especially since your array is not sorted.

To make the search faster, you could subdivide the array and scan each portion separately in separate threads. This would scale linearly with the number of CPU cores you have available on your machine.

If, for example, you have four cores available, then spawn four threads and let each thread scan one fourth of the array.

Probably this discussion might help: Using threads to reduce array search time


In any case (and this is true for any performance related issues), you should profile your code. Create a test case for the approach you have, measure the time it takes and take this as a baseline. Then, for each modification you do, redo the measurement to check if it really improves the execution time. Also make sure to do each measurement more than once (within the same test case) and calculate the average, to reduce caching and other warming up effects (ideally, execute the code at least once before starting the first measurement).

This is Java related, but gives some good feedback that it does not in all cases make sense to parallelize: A Beginner´s Guide to Hardcore Concurrency

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Okay, how about this idea: Make a copy of Array and sort it then count? Then delete the copied Array. Why make a copy? The reason is because we need to keep the original content. –  CLearner Mar 21 '13 at 8:10
    
@CLearner You would, in addition, have the overhead of sorting, which is even more than O(n) –  Andreas Mar 21 '13 at 8:12
    
Threads sounds like a good idea! –  CLearner Mar 21 '13 at 8:14
1  
@CLearner - you should profile this. Starting and stopping threads have its price, too. –  Kiril Kirov Mar 21 '13 at 8:18
    
@KirilKirov Good input - I have added this to my answer –  Andreas Mar 21 '13 at 8:23

The best algorithm would be O(n), where n is the number of elements.

As you need to check each element, you must go through the whole array.

The easies way I can think of, is already written in your own answer.

And there's no faster way to do this - the memory is continuous, the array is not sorted, you need to "touch" each element. That's the fastest possible solution.


Regarding your edit: using std::count and "manually" looping through the array will give you the same performance.


Are there any faster way to search for certain elements within Array

Yes, if the array is sorted. Then you can achieve up to O( log(n) ). Then you would need some existing search algorithm, like binary search, for example.


Would the speed be better if we made a copy of Array and sort it

Depends. If you plan to search for a single char - absolutely not. Copying the array is an expensive operation. Sorting it - even more expensive.

Well, if you will have only one array and you plan to search for, let's say, 100 different characters, then this method could give you a better performance. Now, this really depends on your usage. And nobody will be able to give you the absolutely correct answer for this case. You need to run it and profile.

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How about this idea: Make a copy of Array and sort it then count? Then delete the copied Array. Why make a copy? The reason is because we need to keep the original content. –  CLearner Mar 21 '13 at 8:11
2  
@CLearner - that would be a lot slower that the already suggested methods. Copying the array is an "expensive" operation. Sorting it - too. –  Kiril Kirov Mar 21 '13 at 8:12

What dou you mean by "fast"?

Fast as in complexity, or as an improvement by a constant? You cannot achieve a better complexity with an unsorted array. However, if you change the array very rarely and seach it very often, you can consider sorting it after each change, or better yet, use a different data structure (like a multimap or a set).

If you intend to have a better constant in your O(n), there are some neat tricks which use/abuse the cache of your CPU. If you search for multiple elements, it's genrally faster to search the first few hundred array elements for each of the characters, then the next few hundred, and so on, rather then scan the whole array for each of your search terms. The improvements are not in the complexity, so the effect will usually not be that great. Unless this search happens at your bottleneck repeated deep inside some other algorithm, I would not recommend it. So unless it's inside a rendering algorithm, or a device driver, or for one specific architecture etc. it is most probably not worth it. However, in the rare cases where it might be appropiate, I've seen speed improvements of 3x - 4x or more by using inline assembly and abusing the CPU chache.

EDIT:

Your comment idicated it might be a good idea to include a short introduction about data structures.

  • array, vector: fastest accessing, slow searching, slow adding/removing if not appended to the end.
  • list: slow accessing, slow searching, fastest adding/removing
  • trees, hash tables, etc. : best searching (some allow O(0) searching!), slow changing (depends on type)

I recommend learning about the different data structures (vector, list, map, multimap, set, multiset, etc.) in C++, so you can use the one which best fits your needs.

About the CPU cache: it seems the choosing of a better fitting data structure and code organization is much more important. However, I include this for the sake of completeness. If you search the array in shorter chunks rather than the whole array at once, that part of the array is added to the cache of your CPU, and accessing the cache is much faster than accessing RAM. So you can work on that smaller chunk of your data (for example, search for multiple elements), then switch to the next chunk of data, and so on. This means, for example,

search "a" in elements 1..100
search "b" in elements 1..100
search "c" in elements 1..100
search "a" in elements 101..200
search "b" in elements 101..200
search "c" in elements 101..200
...
search "c" in elements 999901 .. 1000000

can be faster than

search "a" in elements 1..1000000
search "b" in elements 1..1000000
search "c" in elements 1..1000000

If the number of searched elements (a, b, c, ..) is sufficiently large. Why? Because in case of a cache size of 100, in the first example, data is read 10000 times from the RAM, in the second example, 30000 times.

However, the efficiency of this (and your choice of the data chunk size) heavily depends on your architecture, and is only recommended if you are really sure that this is your real bottleneck. Usually it's not.

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Hmm, several good points. And yes it will be searching for multiple elements that are different. Oh and I have a question, what do you mean "abuse the CPU cache"? How do you do that? Sounds very interesting! I never used a multimap, perhaps I should go study a bit on it. Thank you for posting this. –  CLearner Mar 21 '13 at 8:35

Depending on it is one time scan or many times. Sorting will help a lot on the scan speed, you can always narrow down your scan by bisearch. And the complexity could be O(log(n)).

Or if you can beginning from inserting and build the array which will be scan, you can use red-black tree which is slow to insert, but always sorted.

Last but not least, for your very question in which you are scanning "unsigned char array", in which the number of element is limited. You can do one time scan, but it need more memory: use the value of each element inside your unsigned char array as the index of another array which used for storing the scan result.

If you want the position of every element, the other array could be: int scanresult[256][n], where n is the biggest number for the number of certain char.

If you only need count how many 'a' in the array, the other array could be: int scanresult[256], take this as an example, The complexity is O(n), but only need to run once:

unsigned char* Array = new unsigned char[ 50000 ];
/* Fill Array */
int scanresult[256];
for ( int i=0;i<256;++i) { scanresult[i]=0; }
for ( unsigned int Index = 0; Index != 50000; ++ Index )
   scanresult[Array[Index]]++;
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For a single character search, std::count is probably as fast as you're going to get. And for small sets of data (and 50000) is small, you're not likely to notice the time anyway. Of course, for a single character, almost any reasonable algorithm will take less time than it takes to read the data. (std::count on 50000 elements in a vector or a C style array will be close to instantaneous on a modern machine. Orders of magnitude uner your "at least a second", at any rate.)

If you want to go faster, the solution is to not create the array to begin with, but to do the processing on the fly, while you're reading the data (or to get the array immediately, via mmap). And if you need the data for more than one character... just build up a character frequency table as you read the data. And find the fastest way of reading the data (almost certainly mmap under Linux, at least according to some measures I made recently). After that, just index into this table when you want the count. Reading the data will be O(n) (and there's no way around that), but after that, getting the count is O(1), with a very, very small contant factor as well (under a nanosecond on a lot of machines).

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Don't forget, unsigned char > 0 && unsigned char <= 256...

#define MAX 50000 

unsigned char* Array = new unsigned char[ MAX ];
unsigned int Logs[ 256 ];

// Fill Array

::memset( &Logs, 0, sizeof( Logs ) * 256 );
for( unsigned int Index = 0; Index != MAX; ++ Index )
   Logs[ Array[ Index ] ] ++;

delete [] Logs;
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1  
=> 0 and < 256. SO does not allow such a "minor" change.. –  vsz Mar 21 '13 at 9:02

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