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I'm making an application that will able to control remotely a device such as a Camera(Scopia XT5000 - Radvision). I need to send an initialization command to the device for me to be able to send AT commands that will control the device.

Once I send the Initialization Commands, the server should reply this:
In String

??\0\0\0 AT[<IP400C9XT5000-03.01.00.0028\r??\0\0\0OK\r

In Bytes

170 170 0 0 0 32 65 84 91 60 73 80 52 48 48 67 57 88 84 53 48 48 48 45 48 51 46 48 49 46 48 48 46 48 48 50 56 13 170 170 0 0 0 3 79 75 13

I tried to debug and got those values when I put a break in here

serverStream.Read(inStream, 0, inStream.Length);

But every time I run the program without debugging or putting a break, it will give me different string and bytes. Just like this
In String

??\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0

In Bytes

170 170 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

What could be the problem?
Is it:
- the Null bytes?
- the carriage return? "\r"?
- the multiple lines?

Whole Code:

{
    TcpClient clientSocket = new System.Net.Sockets.TcpClient();

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        msg("Client Started");                        
    }

    public void openSocket()
    { 
        if (clientSocket.Connected)
        {
            clientSocket.Close();
        }
        clientSocket = new System.Net.Sockets.TcpClient();
        clientSocket.Connect("10.0.3.202", 55003);
        label1.Text = "Client Socket Program - Server Connected ...";

    }

    private void btnSend_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        openSocket();
        //header bytes and initAT bytes are the initialization command for me to send AT commands
        msg("Init: ");
        NetworkStream serverStream = clientSocket.GetStream();
        //header bytes to enable AT command
        byte[] header = {170,170,0,0,0,8 };
        serverStream.Write(header, 0, header.Length);
        serverStream.Flush();
        //Initialize the Interface
        byte[] initAT = System.Text.Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes("AT[&IPV\r"); 
        serverStream.Write(initAT,0, initAT.Length);
        serverStream.Flush();

        byte[] inStream = new byte[10025];
        serverStream.Read(inStream, 0, inStream.Length);
        string returndata = System.Text.Encoding.ASCII.GetString(inStream);
        msg("Data from Server : " + returndata);
    }

    private void btnRight_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        msg("Right : ");
        NetworkStream serverStream = clientSocket.GetStream();
        //AT Command to move the main camera to right
        byte[] outStream3 = System.Text.Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes("AT[&SY011R\r");
        serverStream.Write(outStream3, 0, outStream3.Length);

        byte[] inStream2 = new byte[48];
        serverStream.Read(inStream2, 0,inStream2.Length);
        string returndata = System.Text.Encoding.ASCII.GetString(inStream2);            
        msg(returndata);
    }           

    public void msg(string mesg)
    {
        textBox1.Text = textBox1.Text + Environment.NewLine + " >> " + mesg;
    }


}
share|improve this question
    
If you read from the network without storing the count returned by the read method you are committing a fundamental programming error. –  EJP Mar 21 '13 at 8:36
    
Hi EJP, thanks for giving me information about reading from the network, but what I'm gonna do with the count returned? Is it really necessary to store it? Could you give me an example where the count returned is being used? –  Geddemet Mar 21 '13 at 9:10
    
Th point is that you are assuming that the read has filled the buffer, instead of using the count to know how much of the buffer is the result of the last read. That's why you're seeing strange data. After the read, you should only use as much of the buffer as is indicated by the returned count. –  EJP Mar 23 '13 at 1:30

1 Answer 1

Read returns the number of bytes read. You have a 10025-byte buffer, but it is not full after Read. You may want to loop until all of the bytes you want are read.

It works when you debug because with the extra time spent, the network stream has time to fully receive the result, so when Read is called, all of the data is available and is put into the buffer.

Reference: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-gb/library/system.io.stream.read.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Kieren, Thanks for the fast response.. Can you give me an example of the loop you are talking about? Because I tried to loop my Read until there's no data available and it just loop once. –  Geddemet Mar 21 '13 at 9:02
    
Another question @Kieren, is there a way to wait the network stream to fully receive the result?, I guess that's what the loop role? or is there any function for that? –  Geddemet Mar 21 '13 at 9:15
    
Loop until you've read all of the data you want - if there's a terminator at the end of the packet, keep reading until you get that, for example –  Kieren Johnstone Mar 21 '13 at 10:18

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