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So I'm having a bit of an issue of not being able to properly read a binary file into my structure. The structure is this:

struct Student
{
    char name[25];
    int quiz1;
    int quiz2;
    int quiz3;
};

It is 37 bytes (25 bytes from char array, and 4 bytes per integer). My .dat file is 185 bytes. It's 5 students with 3 integer grades. So each student takes up 37 bytes (37*5=185).

It looks something like this in plain text format:

Bart Simpson          75   65   70
Ralph Wiggum          35   60   44
Lisa Simpson          100  98   91
Martin Prince         99   98   99
Milhouse Van Houten   80   87   79

I'm able to read each of the records individually by using this code:

Student stud;

fstream file;
file.open("quizzes.dat", ios::in | ios::out | ios::binary);

if (file.fail())
{
    cout << "ERROR: Cannot open the file..." << endl;
    exit(0);
}

file.read(stud.name, sizeof(stud.name));
file.read(reinterpret_cast<char *>(&stud.quiz1), sizeof(stud.quiz1));
file.read(reinterpret_cast<char *>(&stud.quiz2), sizeof(stud.quiz2));
file.read(reinterpret_cast<char *>(&stud.quiz3), sizeof(stud.quiz3));

while(!file.eof())
{
    cout << left 
         << setw(25) << stud.name
         << setw(5)  << stud.quiz1
         << setw(5)  << stud.quiz2
         << setw(5)  << stud.quiz3
         << endl;

    // Reading the next record
    file.read(stud.name, sizeof(stud.name));
    file.read(reinterpret_cast<char *>(&stud.quiz1), sizeof(stud.quiz1));
    file.read(reinterpret_cast<char *>(&stud.quiz2), sizeof(stud.quiz2));
    file.read(reinterpret_cast<char *>(&stud.quiz3), sizeof(stud.quiz3));
}

And I get a nice looking output, but I want to be able to read in one whole structure at a time, not just individual members of each structure at a time. This code is what I believe needed to accomplish the task, but... it doesn't work (I'll show output after it):

*not including the similar parts as far as opening of the file and structure declaration, etc.

file.read(reinterpret_cast<char *>(&stud), sizeof(stud));

while(!file.eof())
{
    cout << left 
         << setw(25) << stud.name
         << setw(5)  << stud.quiz1
         << setw(5)  << stud.quiz2
         << setw(5)  << stud.quiz3
         << endl;

    file.read(reinterpret_cast<char *>(&stud), sizeof(stud));
}

OUTPUT:

Bart Simpson             16640179201818317312
ph Wiggum                288358417665884161394631027
impson                   129184563217692391371917853806
ince                     175193530917020655191851872800

The only part it doesn't mess up is the first name, after that it's down the hill.. I've tried everything and I've no idea what is wrong. I've even searched through the books I have and I couldn't find anything. Things in there look like what I have and they work, but for some odd reason mine doesn't. I did the file.get(ch) (ch being a char) at byte 25 and it returned K, which is ASCII for 75.. which is the 1st test score, so, everything's where it should be. It's just not reading in my structures properly.

Any help would be greatly appreciated, I'm just stuck with this one.

EDIT: After receiving such a large amount of unexpected and awesome input from you guys, I've decided to take your advice and stick with reading in one member at a time. I made things cleaner and smaller by using functions. Thank you once again for providing such quick and enlightening input. It's much appreciated.

IF you're interested in a workaround that's not recommended by most, scroll towards the bottom, to the 3rd answer by user1654209. That workaround works flawlessly, but read all the comments to see why it's not favored.

share|improve this question
1  
Can you show how you wrote the file? –  Retired Ninja Mar 21 '13 at 8:36
2  
If you print sizeof(Student) you will see that it's not 37 bytes. It might possibly be 40 or 56. –  Joachim Pileborg Mar 21 '13 at 8:36
2  
It's because the structure is padded so that the integers start on an nice 32-bit boundary. There are three bytes added by the compiler after the string for that. –  Joachim Pileborg Mar 21 '13 at 8:41
2  
Your writing and reading code needs to mirror each other. If you write parts then you're going to need to read parts. You can force the structure to be packed with no padding, but that generally isn't the best way to handle the problem. Best advice is write each field, read each field. –  Retired Ninja Mar 21 '13 at 8:46
2  
@Noobacode #pragma pack(1) using msvc and attribute ((packed)) using gcc –  user1654209 Mar 21 '13 at 8:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your struct has almost certainly been padded to preserve the alignment of its content. This means that it will not be 37 bytes, and that mismatch causes the reading to go out of sync. Looking at the way each string is losing 3 characters, it seems that it has been padded to 40 bytes.

As the padding is likely to be between the string and the integers, not even the first record reads correctly.

In this case I would recommend not attempting to read your data as a binary blob, and stick to reading individual fields. It's far more robust, especially if you even want to alter your structure.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, it's 40 bytes... unfortunately. Any way to fix that issue? The .dat file is 185 bytes. I do want to try to read it in as a whole, if I can. Unless there's no way. –  B.K. Mar 21 '13 at 8:45
    
It's not an issue, it's a feature. You could potentially hack around it, but the result will be very fragile. I'd recommend against it. –  JasonD Mar 21 '13 at 8:46
    
What do you mean by "fragile"? –  B.K. Mar 21 '13 at 8:55
    
@Noobacode imagine you got it working, and then you decide that you need to add another field to the struct, or change the length of the string. Or maybe you change compiler and ints become 64-bit. As soon as your struct stops matching the binary data, you're out of luck. Handle each field on its own and you can cope with changes. –  JasonD Mar 21 '13 at 9:00
    
Ahh, that makes perfect sense. Thank you! –  B.K. Mar 21 '13 at 9:04

Without seeing the code that writes the data, I'm guessing that you write the data the way you read it in the first example, each element one by one. Then each record in the file will indeed be 37 bytes.

However, since the compiler pads structures to put members on nice boundaries for optimization reasons, your structure is 40 bytes. So when you read the complete structure in a single call, then you actually read 40 bytes at a time, which means that your reading will go out of phase with the actual records in the file.

You either have to re-implement the writing to write the complete structure in one go, or use the first method of reading where you're reading one member field at a time.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, sounds like everyone's on the same page on this one... the original file might have been written one member at a time, thus producing no padding(?). –  B.K. Mar 21 '13 at 8:52

As you've already found out, the padding is the issue here. Also, as others have suggested, the proper way of solving this is to read each member individually as you've done in your example. I don't expect this to cost much more than reading the whole thing in once performance-wise. However, if you still want to go ahead and read it as once, you can tell the compiler to do the padding differently:

#pragma pack(push, 1)
struct Student
{
    char name[25];
    int quiz1;
    int quiz2;
    int quiz3;
};
#pragma pack(pop)

With #pragma pack(push, 1) you tell the compiler to save the current pack value on an internal stack and use a pack value of 1 thereafter. This means you get an alignment of 1 byte, which means no padding at all in this case. With #pragma pack(pop) you tell the compiler to get the last value from the stack and use this thereafter, thereby restoring the behavior the compiler used before the definition of your struct.

While #pragma usually indicates non-portable, compiler-dependent features, this one works at least with GCC and Microsoft VC++.

share|improve this answer
    
Ahh, thank you for further explaining what that implementation did. I wasn't entirely sure what each meant and your explanation is easier to understand than the ones I've read on other sites. –  B.K. Mar 21 '13 at 9:43

A simple workaround is to pack your structure to 1 byte

using gcc

struct __attribute__((packed)) Student
{
    char name[25];
    int quiz1;
    int quiz2;
    int quiz3;
};

using msvc

#pragma pack(push, 1) //set padding to 1 byte, saves previous value
struct  Student
{
    char name[25];
    int quiz1;
    int quiz2;
    int quiz3;
};
#pragma pack(pop) //restore previous pack value

EDIT : As user ahans states : pragma pack is supported by gcc since version 2.7.2.3 (released in 1997) so it seems safe to use pragma pack as the only packed notation if you are targetting msvc and gcc

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much! :) It actually worked flawlessly loading the entire structure in. I'm worried about using it, though, after reading all the comments, heh –  B.K. Mar 21 '13 at 9:11
    
No need to thank :) That's what so is for –  user1654209 Mar 21 '13 at 9:11
    
There's actually no need for the special GCC version, it also understands #pragma pack the same way MSVC does. –  ahans Mar 21 '13 at 9:24
    
@ahans Sure, although I doesn’t remember which gcc version introduced pragma pack support.If someone got the info please comment and I’ll edit the answer –  user1654209 Mar 21 '13 at 9:29
1  
@user1654209 I appears that it's supported at least since gcc 2.7.2.3, which was released in 1997, so I guess it's safe to use today. :) –  ahans Mar 21 '13 at 11:56

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