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In Javascript, the way to create classes (or objects) is to use;

function MyObj()
{
    this.someVar = "xyz";
    this.someMethod = function(){}
}

My simple question is how different is this function from a normal JavaScript function...say a function which adds 2 numbers?

share|improve this question
    
This question is kind of vague. What do you mean exactly? In this function, you assign a value to a variable and call an other function outside your current function. If you add two numbers, you'll probably stay inside the function and won't call an other function. But I don't think that is your question..? –  Joetjah Mar 21 '13 at 9:38
    
II would recommend reading the Article Named function expressions demystified –  C5H8NNaO4 Mar 21 '13 at 9:39
    
Do you mean difference between in-built functions and user-defined functions in javascript? –  Nishu Tayal Mar 21 '13 at 9:39
    
This link will help you to understand it better. –  Mr_Green Mar 21 '13 at 9:54

3 Answers 3

The function aren't different. What makes the difference is how you call them.

For example, those have the same effect :

function MyObj(){
    this.someVar = "xyz";
    this.someMethod = function(){
        console.log(this.someVar);
    }
}
var obj = new MyObj();
obj.someMethod();

and

function someMethod(){
    console.log(this.someVar);
}
function MyObj(){
    this.someVar = "xyz";
}
var obj = new MyObj();
someMethod.call(obj);

and

function someMethod(){
    console.log(this.someVar);
}
function MyObj(){
    this.someVar = "xyz";
}
var obj = new MyObj();
obj.f = someMethod;
obj.f();

As you tagged your question , I'll complete by saying the best way to build your function would have been this one :

function MyObj(){
    this.someVar = "xyz";
}
MyObj.prototype.someMethod = function(){
    console.log(this.someVar);
}
var obj = new MyObj();
obj.someMethod();

This way, all instances of MyObj share the same function and thus are lighter.

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they're not quite the same - in the first version someMethod would have access to any other lexically scoped variables that are declared inside MyObj. In the other versions the method doesn't share lexical scope so couldn't access them. –  Alnitak Mar 21 '13 at 9:46
    
@Alnitak Right, but only if there are scoped variables. –  dystroy Mar 21 '13 at 9:48

The difference is not so much in the contents of the function, but in how you call it.

If you call var myObj = new MyObj() then a new object is created. By convention functions intended for use like this start with a capital letter.

If you were to call the function without the new keyword then exactly the same things happen inside the function, except that this will be the global object instead of the newly created object. This wouldn't matter in a simple "add 2 numbers" function, but can cause very odd bugs if you forget it.

One way to ensure that it doesn't matter if you forget the new call is to put this in the top of your function:

function MyObj() {
     if (! (this instanceof MyObj)) {
         return new MyObj();
     }
     ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
So, your function above make sure that this is referring to MyObj() but not global context. right? –  Mr_Green Mar 21 '13 at 9:46
    
@Mr_Green yes - if new was used then this is already a MyObj so the constructor continues as normal. Otherwise the function returns the result of explicitly calling new on itself. –  Alnitak Mar 21 '13 at 9:50
    
Ahh yes nice one :). Sorry I couln't understand it before. –  Mr_Green Mar 21 '13 at 9:52

None. What matters is the use of the new keyword.

See here:

function Fun(){
    this.method = function(){
        return "Bar";
    }
    return "Foo";
}

var value = Fun(); // assigns the return value of Fun() to value
alert(value); // "Foo"
// alert(value.method()); // won't work because "Foo".method doesn't exist

var instance = new Fun(); // assigns a new instance of Fun() to instance
alert(instance); // [object Object]
alert(instance.method()); // "Bar"
share|improve this answer
    
nb: in your first example, you would actually have created window.method instead of value.method. –  Alnitak Mar 21 '13 at 9:52
    
that's puzzling - normally if you return some other value from a constructor then it replaces this, but that's not happening here. Perhaps that rule only works if you return an object instead of a primitive? –  Alnitak Mar 21 '13 at 9:55
    
RE: window.method being created in the first example - that's correct and an nice observation. RE: a return object replacing this - that's correct too. And is a way to create singleton's in JavaScript: jsfiddle.net/5pFqd –  Oliver Moran Mar 22 '13 at 21:46

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