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I have an assignment in which I need to create some tests for my code. We have to use Junit tests so I have decided to do positive and negative testing of my methods.

For example one test for getting the name from an ArrayList I have positive and negative testing:

Postive:

public void testGetNamePositive() { 
    Entry entry1 = new Entry("Susan Holmes", "122 Harringdale", "Workington", "CA14 2GH"); 
    assertEquals("Susan Holmes",entry1.getName()); 
} 

Negative:

public void testGetNameNegative() { 
    Entry entry1 = new Entry("Susan Holmes", "122 Harringdale", "Workington", "CA14 2GH"); 
    assertFalse( entry1.getName() == "Alison"); 
} 

The test I am unsure about is this one:

public void testEntryCreated() {
    Entry entry1 = new Entry("Susan Holmes", "122 Harringdale", "Workington", "CA14 2GH");
    assertNotNull(entry1);
}

Is there a negative test to this?

share|improve this question
    
While I can see the value of your first test (it is verifying that your constructor works alright), the second test is at least up for discussion. Can you guarantee that entry1.getName != "Alice"? I don't mean to sound snarky, rahter point out that also tests are assets that you need to maintain. So you should try to be very precise about what you want to verify and what might be out of scope. – moxn Mar 21 '13 at 10:29

Entry class public constructor is supposed to have some arguments validation, eg name cannot be null. So you can write a negative test like this

@Test(expected = NullPointerException.class)
public void testCreateEntryWithNameIsNullThrowsNPE() {
    Entry entry1 = new Entry(null, "122 Harringdale", "Workington",
            "CA14 2GH");
}

note that I used JUnit 4

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I'd argue, that the testEntryCreated test is already not necessary. You are here not testing the behavior of your class but rather the capability of the JVM to properly create objects. Instead, focus on testing how you want your objects to behave.

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1  
I like this answer. I guess the only counterargument is that if the ctor is supposed to do some argument validation and throw an exception, you may want to test that. – Oliver Charlesworth Mar 21 '13 at 10:27
    
Yes, I agree. If this is the case, then one of the other answers would be still a better way to test this (expect exceptions, etc). – moxn Mar 21 '13 at 10:31

Im not quite sure what you are trying to test here. All that you are currently testing is that the name variable gets set correctly.

When you unit test you want to test specific methods in isolation (the smalest testable unit) with both negative and positive input.

Your example of negative test is as follows:

public void testGetNameNegative() 

{ 
    Entry entry1 = new Entry("Susan Holmes", "122 Harringdale", "Workington", "CA14 2GH"); 
    assertFalse( entry1.getName() == "Alison"); 
} 

This is not a negative test case. What you would like to test for negative is for example that a name can not contain numbers or be an empty string:

public void testGetNameNegative() 

{ 
    Entry entry1 = new Entry("123", "122 Harringdale", "Workington", "CA14 2GH"); 
    //Expect some behaviour
    Entry entry1 = new Entry("", "122 Harringdale", "Workington", "CA14 2GH"); 
    //Expect some other behavior
} 

What you expect here is probably some kind of exception since you are "testing" the constructor. If this was a method you could expect some kind of return value instead of an exception

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